Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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June 8, 2011. The Consul General for Angola moved from her job in New York to a consular position in Houston. Dr Chika Onyeani, above, gave a speech in recognition of the great work she has been doing in African communities. Dr Chika Onyeani publishes African Sun Times, and is a prolific writer of intellectual works.

Pictures of dancers above right and on Aug Daily Updates. Also on Aug Daily Updates, picture of the Consul General Mrs Julia Machado Esq with Princess Tosin Mustapha and Dr Susanna.
The Republic of Angola
Flag and map from Wikipedia

The Portuguese colonized Angola, and left in 1975, and a civil war started which ended in 2002. Angola has a lot of oil, a lot of minerals and a lot of poverty. They banned Islam in 2013.

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Latest Top (10) News


Sudan military wants to cede power quickly - general
CAIRO (Reuters) - Sudan’s military wants to hand power to a democratically elected government as soon as possible in the tumultuous aftermath of former president Omar al-Bashir’s overthrow, a prominent general said in an interview published on Wednesday.,

“We got tired. We want to hand over power today not tomorrow,” Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, deputy leader of the ruling military council, told Egypt’s state newspaper Al Ahram.

The council has been locked in talks with an alliance of protest and opposition groups demanding civilian leadership for a new sovereign body to oversee a three-year transition to democracy.

Talks were adjourned in the early hours of Tuesday, with no new date set for their resumption.

But Dagalo, who is widely known as Hemedti and leads Sudan’s feared paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF), said the military were impatient for a solution.

“Members of the military council are not politicians and we are waiting for the government to be formed,” he said.

The general, who has emerged as the most prominent member of the military council that ousted and arrested Bashir following months of protests, added that judicial proceedings against the detained former president and some allies were proceeding.

“Until now we have arrested 25 member of the regime figures and we are preparing the files for their charges,” he said.

On Tuesday, Sudan’s main protest group - the Sudanese Professionals Association - called for a general strike, saying the military was still insisting on directing the transition and keeping a military majority on the council. [L5N22X1S6]

Late on Tuesday, a clip of Dagalo suggesting that those who go on strike could lose their jobs was widely circulated on social media. In response, protesters posted photos posing and carrying signs saying “Hemedti, come and fire me!”.

Some protesters accused Dagalo’s RSF of shooting at demonstrations last week, when several protesters were killed and dozens more wounded. The military denied that.

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Wed, 22 May 2019 17:03:39 GMT


Armed gang kills at least 18 in northwest Nigeria
MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - An armed gang killed at least 18 people in the northwest Nigerian state of Katsina, police and residents said on Wednesday, as unrest spreads across the region and into the president’s home state.,
Hundreds of people have died in Nigeria’s northwest since the beginning of the year, in attacks the government attributes to bandits, a loose term for gangs of outlaws carrying out robberies and kidnappings.

Despite military and police operations to quell the conflict, the death toll continues to rise, along with incidents of kidnapping and robbery.

Security experts say Nigeria can ill-afford more instability, with the country already struggling to contain Islamist insurgencies in the northeast, brutal pastoral conflict in the central states and militant groups in the Niger Delta to the southeast.

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In the latest incident, bandits attacked farmers at the village of Yar Gamji, near Nigeria’s border with Niger, on Tuesday morning killing 18 of them, police said.

The attackers escaped into a nearby forest, police said in a statement.

Residents said that while 18 bodies had been found, many more people were feared dead.

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“Right now we are at the Emir’s palace for the mass burial of our relatives, but more than 18 people were killed in this attack,” said Hassan Ibrahim, whose brother was killed.

“There is no peace in Katsina,” he said. “Almost every day they carry out attacks on villagers, killing innocent people.”

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Wed, 22 May 2019 16:59:59 GMT


South Africa swears in new parliament, excludes deputy president
CAPE TOWN (Reuters) - South Africa began swearing in its newly elected parliament on Wednesday, excluding President Cyril Ramaphosa’s influential deputy David Mabuza, who put off taking up his seat to address accusations he had brought the ruling party into disrepute.,

Ramaphosa, who is also the leader of the ANC, is due to be elected to remain president on Wednesday by the 400 lawmakers in parliament’s National Assembly lower house, where his party holds the majority. He will be inaugurated on Saturday.

South Africa’s chief justice started swearing in lawmakers in batches of 10 ahead of the election of parliament’s presiding officers and nominations for president.

The ANC easily won South Africa’s May 8 general election, but its vote share fell to a post-apartheid low, reflecting anger at corruption and racial inequality still entrenched a generation since the former liberation movement took power.

Mabuza’s exclusion is a reminder of the scandals that have damaged the ANC’s popularity and brought down Ramaphosa’s predecessor Jacob Zuma, who was removed from power by the party last year and now faces prosecution for graft.

Mabuza, the former premier of Mpumalanga, a coal-producing northeastern province, has struggled to shrug off longstanding allegations of corruption there. A report by the ANC’s Integrity Commission suggested he had brought the party into disrepute.

“The deputy president has indicated he would like to have an opportunity to address... these allegations,” said Ramaphosa in an ANC statement. “The deputy president believes that the ANC as a governing party should advance the electoral mandate in an environment of public trust.”

 

Mabuza played a key role in ensuring Ramaphosa was elected in a tight contest to take over from Zuma as party leader, which led to Ramaphosa replacing Zuma as president in Feb. 2018.

Another senior ANC politician, Nomvula Mokonyane, a former environmental affairs minister, also postponed her swearing in, with ANC officials citing a family bereavement.

Mokonyane had been nominated for a senior parliamentary position that entails holding the executive to account, but the ANC said it would now find someone else for the post.

Since replacing Zuma, Ramaphosa has pledged to fight corruption, reform struggling state-owned companies and revive a sclerotic economy. But he has struggled to enact reforms in the face of opposition from party rivals.

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Wed, 22 May 2019 16:55:39 GMT


South African lawmakers elect Ramaphosa as state president
CAPE TOWN (Reuters) - South African lawmakers on Wednesday elected Cyril Ramaphosa as state president in the first sitting of parliament since the ruling African National Congress won a majority of parliamentary seats in an election earlier this month.,

Ramaphosa, who is also the leader of the ANC, was elected unopposed by lawmakers in parliament’s National Assembly lower house ahead of his inauguration on Saturday.

The ANC easily won South Africa’s May 8 general election but its share of the vote fell, reflecting anger at corruption scandals and racial inequalities that remain entrenched a generation after the party took power.

 

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Wed, 22 May 2019 16:39:31 GMT


Sylvestre Ilunga Ilukamba named as Congo prime minister
KINSHASA - Sylvestre Ilunga Ilukamba, a career politician and ally of former President Joseph Kabila, was appointed as Democratic Republic of Congo?s prime minister on Monday, the government said in a statement. ,

Ilukamba was previously the head of Congo’s national railway company, known as the SNCC, and has served in various government posts since the 1970s, according to an official biography released on Monday.

 

Felix Tshisekedi won long-delayed presidential elections in Dec. 30, 2018, defeating a candidate officially backed by Kabila, whose own term limit was up.

 

Opposition politicians say the result was rigged in a secret deal between Kabila’s and Tshisekedi’s camps under which Kabila would officially step down but maintain control, a charge they both denied.

 

Forming a new government has taken months, in part because of disagreements over the appointment of a Prime Minister. Kabila had wanted Tshisekedi to appoint Albert Yuma, a Kabila ally and chairman of state mining company Gecamines, but Tshisekedi refused because of Yuma’s checkered history, sources familiar with the matter said.

 

Under Congo’s constitution, the candidate must come from the ranks of the parliamentary majority, Kabila’s Common Front for Congo (FCC). Ilukamba is also from Katanga, the same mineral-rich part of the country as Kabila.

 

Despite concerns, the appointment marks at least an official move on from Kabila’s 18-year rule. On Monday, Congolese opposition leader Moise Katumbi returned home from three years in exile, one of a series of indicted politicians cleared under Tshisekedi’s administration.

 

Thousands of supporters came out to welcome Katumbi at the airport in Lubumbashi, the main city in his political heartland in the copper-mining Katanga region.

 

“I’m happy to be back home, the truth always triumphs,” he said.

 

Tshisekedi has pardoned 700 prisoners including three political opponents of his predecessor Joseph Kabila since coming to power in January.

 

His supporters say the moves point to a new era political openness after years of suppression of opposition figures.

 

Katumbi fled the country in May 2016 in the face of accusations he had hired mercenaries as part of a plot against Kabila’s government.

 

He was then sentenced in absentia to three years in prison for real estate fraud - both charges his supporters said were aimed at preventing him from running in an election to replace Kabila.

 

But Katumbi’s fraud conviction was overturned by an appeals court last month. And prosecutors said they had also dropped their investigations into the mercenary accusations “given that the president of the republic has made easing political tensions his priority”.

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Wed, 22 May 2019 12:41:56 GMT


Zimbabwe scraps official parity for fuel imports
HARARE - Oil companies in Zimbabwe will from Tuesday buy dollars to import fuel on the interbank market after the central bank ended the1:1 peg to the dollar that the firms were using, the bank said, a move that could see the price of fuel going up. ,

The Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe introduced a new local currency and an interbank market in February to allow companies and individuals to trade in forex.

Importers of fuel were, however, allowed to buy dollars from the central bank at a rate of 1:1 to the greenback.

That arrangement has ended and the companies would only access dollars on the interbank market from Tuesday, RBZ Governor John Mangudya said in a statement.

“The new position is necessary to promote the efficient use of foreign exchange and to minimize and guard against incidences of arbitrage within the economy,” Mangudya said.Reuters

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Wed, 22 May 2019 11:31:54 GMT


Top News May 22, 2019 / 9:06 AM / Updated 3 hours ago Cameroonian girls defy prejudice to pursue soccer dreams
YAOUNDE - When Gaelle Asheri first started playing soccer in the dirt streets near her home in Cameroon’s capital, she was the only girl on the informal neighbourhood teams which used stones for goal posts and kept score by chalking results on a wall. ,

Asheri, 17, and her teammate Ida Pouadjeu, 16, are now among the first wave of girls being trained by professional coaches at the Rails Foot Academy (RFA) in Yaounde. It was set up in January to foster female soccer talent in a country where many still see the sport as a man’s game.

“I used to train with boys, so with boys there were some exercises I was not allowed to do because I am a girl,” Asheri said, describing how she was seen as more fragile than her male counterparts.

“But reaching here it was just another world, I was forced to do abdominal exercises, forced to do all harsh work so you reach a level where tears usually come out with sweat.”

The academy gets its name from the train tracks that hem the playing ground and turn into informal stands for the local spectators, who gather to watch the girls’ teams play all-male sides.

Global interest in women’s soccer is growing and FIFA hopes over a billion viewers will tune in to watch the Women’s World Cup in June. [nL5N22Q34V] Cameroon’s national side, known as the Indomitable Lionesses, was one of three African teams to qualify.

 

Its star player, Gaelle Enganamouit, was the brains behind RFA - the West African country’s first female soccer academy. Her own experience as a young player in Yaounde showed her that it was important for women to have their own space to train, she told FIFA in January.

The academy currently trains around 70 girls, most of whom come from poor backgrounds and would otherwise not be able to afford even their own soccer boots, said coach Emmanuel Biolo.

“Here they have everything: coaches, jerseys, training equipment, a physiotherapist, and the guidance we give them all the time. Gaelle Enganamouit really wants these kids to be the next generation,” he said.

Asheri attends the academy on Saturday mornings and after school on Wednesdays, changing out of her uniform - a belted blue knee-length dress - into her team’s matching kit.

She is studying for her final baccalaureate exams, but the dream for her and Pouadjeu is to play soccer at a professional level like their benefactor.

“I’ve seen Gaelle (Enganamouit) play on TV. I’ve never missed one of her matches. She plays so well, I want to be like her,” Pouadjeu said.

 

Both girls initially faced opposition from family members who were worried that the sport was unfeminine. But neither have been deterred by such prejudice.

“I picked up the ball, I kicked it and I never looked back,” Asheri said, recalling the childhood street soccer games with her male cousins and neighbours.Reuters

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Wed, 22 May 2019 11:25:30 GMT


South African deputy president will not be sworn-in as MP today
CAPE TOWN - South Africa’s deputy president, David Mabuza, will not be sworn in as a lawmaker on Wednesday after requesting a postponement to address allegations he brought the ruling African National Congress (ANC) into disrepute, president Cyril Ramaphosa said. ,

Ramaphosa, who is also the leader of the ANC, is due to be elected on Wednesday by the 400 lawmakers in parliament’s National Assembly and lower house, where his party holds the majority. He will be inaugurated on Saturday.

 

The ANC easily won South Africa’s May 8 general election but its share of the vote fell, reflecting anger at corruption scandals and racial inequalities that remain entrenched a generation after the party took power.

Mabuza, the former premier of Mpumalanga, a coal-producing northeastern province, has struggled to shrug off longstanding allegations of corruption there. A report by the ANC’s Integrity Commission suggested he had brought the party into disrepute.

 

“The deputy president has indicated he would like to have an opportunity to address... these allegations,” said Ramaphosa in an ANC statement. “The deputy president believes that the ANC as a governing party should advance the electoral mandate in an environment of public trust.”

Mabuza played a key role in ensuring Ramaphosa was elected in a tight contest to take over from scandal-plagued predecessor Jacob Zuma at the ANC’s election conference in December 2017.Reuters

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Wed, 22 May 2019 11:05:59 GMT


Malawians vote in tough election for president Mutharika
BLANTYRE/LILONGWE, Malawi - Malawians on Tuesday voted in presidential and parliamentary elections seen as a tough test for President Peter Mutharika who is running against the deputy president and a former pastor who heads the opposition. ,

Malawi is dependent on foreign aid and is frequently beset by drought which threatens the lives of thousands of people.

Former law professor Mutharika, 78, oversaw infrastructure improvements and a slowdown in inflation in his first five-year term, but critics accuse him of corruption and cronyism.

Mutharika refutes those accusations. He is popular in rural areas for his government’s agricultural subsidy programme, but elsewhere some people want change.

“People should be free to vote as they like. That is democracy,” Mutharika told reporters at a polling station in Thyolo in his home district.

He cast his vote accompanied by senior figures from his Democratic Progressive Party (DPP).

Voters will cast ballots for president, parliament and ward councillors. Polls close around 1600 GMT and counting is expected to take days.

“I have a strong feeling that the choice I made will carry the day,” said Tima Nyirongo, 31, a mother of two who voted at a polling station in Blantyre, the southern African country’s commercial capital.Reuters

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Wed, 22 May 2019 11:05:09 GMT


Libyan gunmen halt water pipeline to besieged Tripoli
TRIPOLI- Gunmen have cut off the main water pipeline to Libya’s besieged capital, Tripoli, spelling more misery for residents already reeling from weeks of fighting. ,

The United Nations said the water blockage was a possible war crime as Libya’s internationally recognized government accused forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar, which have been trying to capture Tripoli, of being behind the blockage.

The group on Sunday raided a station of the Great Man-Made River Project, a pipe network supplying ground water from the Sahara, the company said. The gunmen forced employees to turn off the pipes at the installation 400 km (250 miles) south of Tripoli.

The eastern forces of Haftar’s Libya National Army (LNA) launched an assault on Tripoli in early April and are bogged down in southern suburbs by fighters loyal to the U.N.-backed government of Prime Minister Fayez al-Serraj.

In past attacks on the pipeline, which was one of former dictator Muammar Gaddafi’s few development projects, it has taken up to two days for households to notice water shortages in the coastal city of 2.5 million people.

The Tripoli government blamed a group that also cut the water supplies in 2017, saying its commander, Khalifa Ehnaish, belonged to Haftar’s forces.

The LNA denied that. Ehnaish could not be reached.

“Considering this was a closure of the valves in an LNA-controlled area, the complicity of Ehnaish with the LNA in orchestrating this cannot be discounted,” said Emad Badi, a non-resident scholar with the Middle East Institute.

Fighting in the battle for Tripoli has killed at least 510 people, forced 75,000 out of their homes, trapped thousands of migrants in detention centers, and flattened some southern suburbs.

It has also forced the closure of schools, split families on different sides of the front line, and brought power-cuts.

The conflict is one of the most serious flare-ups in years of chaos since the 2011 toppling of Gaddafi, and has sharpened Gulf divisions over Libya,REUTERS.

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Tue, 21 May 2019 12:20:43 GMT