Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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June 8, 2011. The Consul General for Angola moved from her job in New York to a consular position in Houston. Dr Chika Onyeani, above, gave a speech in recognition of the great work she has been doing in African communities. Dr Chika Onyeani publishes African Sun Times, and is a prolific writer of intellectual works.

Pictures of dancers above right and on Aug Daily Updates. Also on Aug Daily Updates, picture of the Consul General Mrs Julia Machado Esq with Princess Tosin Mustapha and Dr Susanna.
The Republic of Angola
Flag and map from Wikipedia

The Portuguese colonized Angola, and left in 1975, and a civil war started which ended in 2002. Angola has a lot of oil, a lot of minerals and a lot of poverty. They banned Islam in 2013.

Latest Top (10) News


‘The Far Away Brothers’ Breathes Vivid Life Into Immigration Issues
Lauren Markham’s impeccably timed and intimately reported book follows twin teenage brothers on their journey from El Salvador to California.

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 14:13:42 -0500


In El Salvador, ‘Girls Are a Problem’
Salvadoran women are facing an epidemic of violence fueled by impunity and a culture that normalizes machismo.

Sat, 02 Sep 2017 17:27:46 -0500


Scarred by the Past, an Ex-Gang Member Aims for Revival
The tattoos inked onto the bodies and faces of former gang members in El Salvador make a new start nearly impossible. A photographer followed and documented one former gang member.

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 04:00:29 -0500


Sessions Calls Trump’s Remarks ‘Hurtful’ but Pledges to Press On
In an interview with Fox News, the attorney general defended his choice to recuse himself from the Russia investigation and said he remained committed to doing his job.

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 22:48:18 -0500


The Gang Murders in the Suburbs
Four young Latino men went to hang out in the woods on Long Island one night during spring break. They ended up victims of the brutal gang MS-13.

Wed, 12 Jul 2017 13:40:29 -0500


Mexico Easily Defeats El Salvador in Gold Cup Match
Mexico won its Concacaf Gold Cup opener before a decidedly pro-Mexico crowd in San Diego on Sunday.

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 00:21:48 -0500


At Least 2 Are Killed in Fire in El Salvador’s Finance Ministry
President Salvador Sánchez Cerén confirmed that a woman, a union worker, had died in a blaze that sent people jumping from the nine-story building.

Fri, 07 Jul 2017 21:46:02 -0500


Trump’s Doubtful Claims About a Gang and Mexican Sugar
President Trump falsely said he had deported half of the notorious street gang MS-13, and exaggerated a trade deal with Mexico as groundbreaking.

Thu, 29 Jun 2017 16:43:52 -0500


Man Charged With Killing Muslim Teenager Entered United States Illegally, Authorities Say
Darwin Martinez Torres, who is accused of killing Nabra Hassanen on Sunday in Virginia, is from El Salvador, Immigration and Customs Enforcement said.

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 21:46:44 -0500


An Intergenerational Graduación
My parents sacrificed everything for my safety and education. It was only fitting they share the stage with me at graduation.

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 03:22:03 -0500

Latest Top (10) News


Ethiopia army banned from Oromia-Somali areas amid peace efforts
Addis Ababa - The Ethiopian government has disclosed that the army has effectively been banned from playing any role in the search for peace in a boundary crisis between the Oromia and Somali regional states.,

Information Minister Negeri Lencho at a press briefing said as part of peace efforts in the wake of recent deadly clashes, the government was tackling the source of the tensions but also actively helping displaced persons with much needed assistance.

A high-powered government delegation led by deputy Prime Minister Derneke Mekonnen is said to have visited displaced persons in the town of Dire Dawa, Harar, Hamaresa and Babile, state-affiliated FANA Broadcasting corporate reported.

The minister also disclosed that arrests have been made of people believed to be behind the hostilities. He admitted that even though suspects in Oromia have been picked up, the Somali state officials were not showing enough commitment to do same.

The inter-state clashes is said to be ethnic in nature even though political, human rights watchers and Oromo activists insist that it has an element of government complicity.

Most residents in Oromia believe that the government continues to arm a paramilitary force, the Liyu Police’ located in the Somali region as part of efforts to clamp down on Oromo protesters.

Some residents and activists continue to blame the Liyu Police for recent clashes between Oromo and Somali ethnic groups.

Despite long-standing talk of resource control fueling the tensions, some residents and activists say the Liyu police are more to blame for recent incidents.

Meanwhile, a new wave of anti-government protests continue to gain currency in Oromia – the heartland of similar protests between 2015 - 2016. It led to a state of emergency in October 2016, a six-month measure that eventually lasted 10 months, it was lifted in early August 2017. Africanews

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:53:07 GMT


UN chief insists on sending extra 900 peacekeepers to CAR
Amid a U.S. push to cut United Nations peacekeeping costs, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said on Wednesday he hoped the U.N. Security Council would agree to send an extra 900 troops to protect civilians in Central African Republic.,

Guterres, who will visit Central African Republic next week, told reporters that while peacekeepers had “helped avert the worst” when mass atrocities were being committed in the country five years ago, the situation remained “very troubling.”

“Across the country, communal tensions are growing. Violence is spreading. And the humanitarian situation is deteriorating,” Guterres said. “There is a need to increase the capacity of our troops in Central African Republic to protect civilians.”

“I am convinced there will be a very positive understanding of all the members of the Security Council, including the United States of America, in relation to this,” he said.

Thousands have died and a fifth of Central Africans have fled a conflict that broke out after mainly Muslim Seleka rebels ousted President Francois Bozize in 2013, provoking a backlash from Christian anti-balaka militias.

Although unrest has since subsided, fighting has spiked this year and the United Nations warned that ethnic fighting could descend again into a much larger conflict.

U.N. peacekeepers were deployed in 2014 and the Security Council is due to renew the mandate for the mission of more than 12,000 troops and police by mid-November. In a report to the council on Tuesday, Guterres recommended an extra 900 troops.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley has led a push to cut peacekeeping costs and is reviewing each operation as annual mandates come up for renewal by the Security Council. President Donald Trump wants to cap the U.S. share of the peacekeeping bill at 25 percent, down from 28.5 percent, a level he says is “unfair.”

The United States is a veto-wielding member of the council, along with Britain, France, Russia and China. There are currently more than a dozen peacekeeping missions with a total annual budget of more than $7.3 billion.

Guterres has pledged to make U.N. peacekeeping more efficient but has noted that the current budget to fund it is less than one half of 1 percent of global military spending.

U.N. peacekeepers in Central African Republic have also been dogged by allegations of sexual abuse that the world body has been working to address.

“I am pained that some peacekeepers are alleged to have committed egregious acts of sexual exploitation and abuse against the people of the Central African Republic,” Guterres said.

Reuters/Africanews

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:48:59 GMT


Sierra Leone's 2018 poll takes shape as major candidates are announced
Sierra Leoneans will go to the polls in 2018 to elect a new president. Incumbent Ernest Bai Koroma is not eligible to stand after serving two consecutive terms.,

Koroma came to power in 2007 under the aegis of the All People’s Congress (APC), he won a second term in November 2012. The two main candidates aiming for Bai Koroma’s seat are a minister and former junta leader turned politician.

The ruling APC has subsequently chosen the current Foreign Minister, Samura Camara, as its candidate for the March 2018 polls. Koroma is on record to have said he is the man to win the elections for the APC in March.

Candidate Samura along with President Bai Koroma and his running mate Chernor Bah, paraded the streets last week after a party congress where they were elected.

The main opposition Sierra Leone Peoples Party (SLPP) has also picked a retired brigadier, Julius Maada Bio as its candidate as it aims to return to power after a decade in opposition.

Bio beat three others in the primaries with all his contenders pledging to support him wrestle power from the APC.

A Reuters journalist in the country, Umaru Fofana, pointed out a political history between the two men dating back to 1996.

There was talk of a possible postponement of the elections after a deadly mudslide in August left hundreds dead. The government at the time was said to be considering the imposition of a state of emergency on relief and political grounds. The current development means that move will not be pursued. Africanews

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:47:52 GMT


Private sector: Government will create a financing line worth 5 million escudos
Praia - The creation of a financing line worth five million contos and the import tax exemption are some of the concrete measures included in the State Budget for 2018, said the Minister of Finance on Tuesday.,

Olavo Correia, who was meeting in Praia this afternoon during an “Open Talk” with the Sotavento Chamber of Commerce (CCS), and the businessmen to discuss the general guidelines of the State Budget for 2018, said that the idea is that from next year the private sector will no longer say that the issue of financing remains one of the sector constraints.

“The proposal has already been presented to the chambers of commerce, and we have a team with consultants and by the end of the year we will have the program designed, covering all sectors, in order to define the rules of access and avoid political interference in the decision of any application,” he said.

Regarding to air and sea transport, which have created business-class constraints, Olavo Correia said that the document brings “efficient measures and solutions” to the whole sector, since it is a question that goes beyond the size of one  entrepreneur, emphasizing that the country can not stay as it is in relation to this sector. Reuters

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:18:56 GMT


Somalis defy police to protest against deadly truck bombings
MOGADISHU - Thousands of Somalis demonstrated on Wednesday against those behind bombings that killed more than 300 people, defying police who opened fire to keep them away from the site where their loved-ones were killed. ,

The twin blasts in the heart of Mogadishu on Saturday also injured more than 400 in what were the country’s deadliest truck bombings.

Police initially opened fire to prevent people from accessing the rubble-strewn scene of the attack, injuring at least two people, the emergency response service said. But, overwhelmed by the number of people, they eventually let thousands of protesters gather at the site.

Residents said they had never seen such a big protest in the city.

“We are demonstrating against the terrorists that massacred our people. We entered the road by force,” said Halima Abdullahi, a mother who lost six of her relatives in the attacks.

The Islamist militant group al Shabaab, which began an insurgency in 2007, has not claimed responsibility, but the method and type of attack - a large truck bomb - is increasingly used by the al Qaeda-linked organisation.

Mohamed Ali, a police captain at the scene, said it was fine for protesters to access the site to express their grief.

“For some who could not see their relatives alive or dead, the only chance they have is to at least see the spot where their beloved were killed,” he told Reuters.

Later President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed addressed demonstrators at a football field in the city and called on Somalis to join the national army.

“Take your guns and let’s liberate our country. Come forward for recruitment (into) government forces in order to fight and eliminate al Shabaab,” he said.

The government buried at least 160 of those killed because they could not be identified after the blast.

Masked security officers kept an eye on the protest on foot and on motorbikes. Some protesters sat on police trucks waving sticks and chanting: “We do not want al Shabaab”.

The militants were driven out of Mogadishu in 2011 and have been steadily losing territory. But they retain the capacity to mount large bomb attacks.

Over the past three years, the number of civilians killed by insurgent bombings has steadily climbed as al Shabaab increases the size of its bombs.

In the central town of Dusamareb, residents also marched for several hours to protest against the bombings in Mogadishu and clerics called for the war on the militants to be stepped up.

Abdikadir Abdirahman, the director of Aamin Ambulances, said one pregnant demonstrator was evacuated from the Mogadishu protest after she developed complications.

“The other two were also demonstrating. They were injured by bullets which the police fired to disperse the demonstrators who wanted to enter the blast scene by force,” he said. Reuters

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:17:44 GMT


Somalia praises "genuine brother" Turkey for quick response to bombs
MOGADISHU - Turkey’s swift response to Somalia’s deadliest truck bombing drew praise from survivors and officials who called Ankara their “only genuine” international partner, an implicit challenge to that Western backers that spend billions on security. ,

Within 48 hours of the huge twin explosions that hit Mogadishu on Saturday, a Turkish air ambulance had landed in the battle-scarred capital and picked up dozens of wounded Somalis to transport them to Turkey for free medical treatment.

Its health minister also pitched up with surgeons who set to work at once in hospitals alongside Somali doctors and nurses.

Ankara has invested heavily in Somalia over the past five years, with one eye on rich economic pickings should stability ever return and the other on burnishing President Tayyip Erdogan’s image of Turkey as a global promoter of compassionate Islam.

“Turkey is the best friend to Somalia and they were the first supporter to us after the blast,” said Abdiasis Ahmed, a jobless university graduate who said four friends had been airlifted out, one with a broken back.

At least 300 people were killed in the blasts and more than 400 injured. Although Islamist al Shabaab militants were pushed out of Mogadishu in 2011, Saturday’s attack - which al Shabaab has not claimed - shows the dangers still facing the capital.

Many Somalis contrasted Ankara’s response with that of the European Union, which has a naval force including combat ships equipped with emergency medical systems off Mogadishu’s shore to deter piracy, but which did not take in casualties.

“I’ve heard a lot of complaints from Somalis saying ‘There’s a huge Western navy on our shores - why can’t those people come to help us?',” said Rashid Abdi, a Nairobi-based Somalia analyst at International Crisis Group, a think-tank.

A spokesman for the EU mission in Nairobi had no immediate comment, although a Tweet from the naval force on Wednesday said it was providing “vital medical aid” for the victims.

Senior officials also compared the speed and scale of Turkey’s assistance with that of Somalia’s foreign partners, including neighbours Kenya and Djibouti and the United States and the United Nations.

Mogadishu mayor Thabit Mohamed tweeted on Monday that he was grateful for Turkey’s “immediate response” and “relief for victims”, compared with a “Thanks for standing with #Mogadishu” tweet 24 hours later aimed at the U.S. Embassy.

“Turkey is always first to help us. They are our only genuine brother,” Information minister Abdirahman Omar Osman told Reuters, recalling a personal visit by Erdogan in 2011, when Somalia was in the grip of famine.

“Their support is visible to everyone. They build hopsitals, they build schools, and that’s why they are different than others,” he said. “Others might give more money but Turkey is perceived by the people to be the ones really helping Somalia.”

His thoughts were echoed in a cartoon by popular cartoonist Amin Amir circulating on Somali social media depicting a Turkish Airlines plane surrounded by boxes labelled “equipment and supplies”.

Next to its stand two men with a thought bubble: “Whenever there is a problem, Turkey helps us. Where are the other countries? It is the only brother country we have. The other countries are enemies that pursue their interest.” Reuters

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:16:26 GMT


Somalis defy police to protest against deadly truck bombings
MOGADISHU - Thousands of Somalis demonstrated on Wednesday against those behind bombings that killed more than 300 people, defying police who opened fire to keep them away from the site where their loved-ones were killed. ,

The twin blasts in the heart of Mogadishu on Saturday also injured more than 400 in what were the country’s deadliest truck bombings. [nL8N1MR0O7]

Police initially opened fire to prevent people from accessing the rubble-strewn scene of the attack, injuring at least two people, the emergency response service said. But, overwhelmed by the number of people, they eventually let thousands of protesters gather at the site.

Residents said they had never seen such a big protest in the city.

“We are demonstrating against the terrorists that massacred our people. We entered the road by force,” said Halima Abdullahi, a mother who lost six of her relatives in the attacks.

The Islamist militant group al Shabaab, which began an insurgency in 2007, has not claimed responsibility, but the method and type of attack - a large truck bomb - is increasingly used by the al Qaeda-linked organisation.

Mohamed Ali, a police captain at the scene, said it was fine for protesters to access the site to express their grief.

“For some who could not see their relatives alive or dead, the only chance they have is to at least see the spot where their beloved were killed,” he told Reuters.

Later President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed addressed demonstrators at a football field in the city and called on Somalis to join the national army.

“Take your guns and let’s liberate our country. Come forward for recruitment (into) government forces in order to fight and eliminate al Shabaab,” he said.

The government buried at least 160 of those killed because they could not be identified after the blast.

Masked security officers kept an eye on the protest on foot and on motorbikes. Some protesters sat on police trucks waving sticks and chanting: “We do not want al Shabaab”.

The militants were driven out of Mogadishu in 2011 and have been steadily losing territory. But they retain the capacity to mount large bomb attacks.

Over the past three years, the number of civilians killed by insurgent bombings has steadily climbed as al Shabaab increases the size of its bombs.

In the central town of Dusamareb, residents also marched for several hours to protest against the bombings in Mogadishu and clerics called for the war on the militants to be stepped up.

Abdikadir Abdirahman, the director of Aamin Ambulances, said one pregnant demonstrator was evacuated from the Mogadishu protest after she developed complications.

“The other two were also demonstrating. They were injured by bullets which the police fired to disperse the demonstrators who wanted to enter the blast scene by force,” he said. Reuters

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:58:41 GMT


One dead at protest against extending Ugandan president's rule
KAMPALA - At least one person died as police fired bullets and teargas to disperse a crowd of opposition supporters rallying on Wednesday against plans to extend Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni’s rule. ,

Police have broken up a series of protests in recent days against a bill to let the 73-year-old president stand again in 2021 elections - the constitution currently sets an age limit for candidates at 75.

Rights organisations and activists have criticised moves by several other long-serving African rulers, notably in Rwanda, Burundi and Burkina Faso, to stay in power by extending term limits.

Police spokesman Elly Maate said one person died after officers fired bullets in the air to disperse a crowd gathering for what he called “an illegal rally” near a stadium in the southwestern town of Rukungiri.

Opposition party member Ingrid Turinawe and a local government official both said two men died.

Turinawe said a bullet also struck a vehicle carrying opposition leader Kizza Besigye. He was not hurt but an image showed a gaping hole in the rear window of his vehicle.

A Museveni-allied legislator introduced the bill to remove the presidential age limit last month.

Museveni met MPs backing the measure last week and for the first time openly expressed his support for the legislation, several local media outlets reported. Reuters

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:54:45 GMT


FBI opens investigation into South Africa's Guptas: FT
JOHANNESBURG - The FBI has opened an investigation into U.S. links to South Africa’s Guptas, escalating a scandal over the family’s alleged use of a friendship with President Jacob Zuma to control state businesses, the Financial Times said on Thursday. ,

Separately, Britain’s banking regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), said it was in contact with two UK banks over any possible links to the Gupta family.

The Guptas and Zuma have denied any wrongdoing. Gupta family spokesman Gary Naidoo could not be reached for comment and the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria had no immediate comment.

The family, founders of a business empire spanning media, mining and consulting, have been named in a trove of leaked emails alleging graft in dealing with South Africa’s state-owned companies, which also named several global firms.

The Financial Times, which cited “people familiar with the matter”, said U.S. investigators had been looking at individuals, bank accounts and companies in the U.S. for ties to alleged graft involving the family. It gave no further details.

Britain’s FCA said it was in contact with HSBC and Standard Chartered banks following reports in British newspapers that the finance minister had asked regulators to investigate the lenders’ possible ties to the Gupta family and Zuma.

“The FCA is already in contact with both banks named and will consider carefully further responses received,” the regulator said.

Standard Chartered in London said they were not able to comment on details of client transactions but added that ”after an internal investigation, accounts were closed by us by early 2014”. HSBC said it had no comment on the matter.

Britain’s parliament is expected to discuss British banks’ possible involvement in the Gupta case on Thursday.

Zweli Mkhize, one of several potential candidates to replace Zuma as head of the African National Congress in December, said the United States and Britain were within their rights to investigate.

“If there is any information suggesting corruption or irregularities, it needs to be investigated across the borders. It should not be restricted to South Africa,” he told reporters.

The Guptas and their companies have not been charged with any crime in South Africa, but the scandal is one of many that have dogged the Zuma presidency.

Local media have reported extensively on the so-called “Gupta-leaks” - thousands of emails between the Guptas and their lieutenants and state-owned companies, politically connected individuals and private sector firms. Reuters

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:50:22 GMT


Four killed in Togo as protesters clash with security forces
LOME - Four people were killed in Togo on Wednesday in clashes between security forces and demonstrators calling for an end to a half century of Gnassingbe family rule, the security minister said. ,

Opposition activists have been demonstrating since August against Gnassingbe’s administration and say a constitutional reform he has proposed would allow him to rule the West African country until 2030.

Colonel Damehame Yark, the security and civil protection minister, told a news conference that one person was shot dead and around sixty others arrested in the capital, Lome. Another three died of gunshot wounds in the second-biggest city, Sokode.

“These are too many deaths. We’d be wise to preserve the peace,” he said.

The latest bout of protests followed the arrest in Sokode on Monday of a Muslim imam accused of urging his followers to murder soldiers.

Clashes erupted after the arrest. A crowd killed two soldiers and one other person died in unspecified circumstances, the government said in a statement. About 20 other people were injured, it added.

The deaths reignited a mass protest movement against President Faure Gnassingbe, who succeeded his late father Gnassingbe Eyadema in 2005.

The protesters are calling for his resignation.

“We deplore this toll and we say that backing down is out of the question. Despite what we have suffered, we will maintain our call for protests tomorrow,” said Brigitte Adjamagbo, one of the leaders of the opposition movement.

She said the coalition was aware of two people killed, including an 11-year-old child, as well as twenty others who were seriously injured and dozens of arrests.

In a bid to curb demonstrations, the government has banned marches and mass protests on weekdays.

But young protesters in Be, a working-class neighbourhood in eastern Lome, defied the ban on Wednesday. They erected barricades with bricks and burning tyres and threw stones at security forces, who responded with volleys of tear gas.

“This is our last bastion,” shouted one demonstrator, Ayi Koffi. “We have no arms, no gas. We do not have cars to pick up people. We have come out barehanded to say, enough!”

In a statement, the International Organisation of La Francophonie, a group comprised mainly of French-speaking countries including Paris’s former colonies, said that nothing justified the violence.

“Dialogue must be prioritised in all circumstances,” it said.

The controversial constitutional reform will be decided by popular referendum after the bill failed to win approval from parliament following a boycott by opposition lawmakers last month.

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Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:48:36 GMT