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Scam, kidnap by South African police

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June 8, 2011. The Consul General for Angola moved from her job in New York to a consular position in Houston. Dr Chika Onyeani, above, gave a speech in recognition of the great work she has been doing in African communities. Dr Chika Onyeani publishes African Sun Times, and is a prolific writer of intellectual works.

Pictures of dancers above right and on Aug Daily Updates. Also on Aug Daily Updates, picture of the Consul General Mrs Julia Machado Esq with Princess Tosin Mustapha and Dr Susanna.
The Republic of Angola
Flag and map from Wikipedia

The Portuguese colonized Angola, and left in 1975, and a civil war started which ended in 2002. Angola has a lot of oil, a lot of minerals and a lot of poverty. They banned Islam in 2013.

Latest Top (10) News


La oleada histórica de niños migrantes que cruzan solos la frontera surge de la desesperación
Las detenciones han aumentado a medida que la agresiva política migratoria del gobierno de Donald Trump ha coincidido con un éxodo de niños que huyen de Centroamérica.

Wed, 30 Oct 2019 18:23:03 GMT


Detentions of Child Migrants at the U.S. Border Surges to Record Levels
Detentions have surged as the Trump administration’s aggressive policy toward migrants has collided with an exodus of children fleeing Central America.

Tue, 29 Oct 2019 21:48:41 GMT


Un marine veterano es deportado a El Salvador
José Segovia Benítez, quien fue condenado por algunos delitos, fue deportado de Estados Unidos y ahora está escondido en el país centroamericano, dijo su abogado.

Mon, 28 Oct 2019 16:47:48 GMT


Marine Veteran Is Deported to El Salvador
Jose Segovia-Benitez, who has been convicted of several felonies, was sent out of the United States this week and is now in hiding in El Salvador, his lawyer said.

Fri, 25 Oct 2019 17:00:49 GMT


Building for Real With Digital Blocks
To improve community structures with citizens’ input, the United Nations uses a computer game inspired by Lego.

Tue, 15 Oct 2019 15:45:30 GMT


Trump Attracts Central American Support for Hard-Line Migration Policies
The Salvadoran president, Nayib Bukele, has courted the White House. And on Wednesday, Honduras signed an agreement to help thwart asylum seekers from entering the United States.

Wed, 25 Sep 2019 09:00:06 GMT


To Influence El Salvador, China Dangled Money. The U.S. Made Threats.
As part of a push into Central America, China presented itself as a deep-pocketed partner for El Salvador’s future. The Trump administration countered with words of warning.

Sat, 21 Sep 2019 16:00:12 GMT


U.S. Agreement With El Salvador Seeks to Divert Asylum Seekers
An agreement between the United States and El Salvador will prevent migrants from crossing the southwestern border by requiring them to seek protection in El Salvador first.

Fri, 20 Sep 2019 16:44:59 GMT


‘Ahora tengo miedo a diario’: los obreros salvadoreños en Washington enfrentan la deportación
Cientos de miles de trabajadores de la construcción salvadoreños corren el riesgo de ser deportados, lo cual generaría graves repercusiones económicas, advierten contratistas y dirigentes sindicales.

Mon, 16 Sep 2019 11:00:01 GMT


Salvadorans, Washington’s Builders, Face Expulsion Under Trump
Tens of thousands of workers in and around the capital were here legally because of adversity in their homeland. Now they are fighting to stay.

Fri, 13 Sep 2019 09:00:11 GMT

Latest Top (10) News


'So many dead': Survivors describe terrifying Burkina Faso ambush
OUAGADOUGOU (Reuters) - A mine worker shot during an ambush on a mining convoy in Burkina Faso said on Friday he was one of only three survivors from a bus with up to 80 people aboard, suggesting the death toll may be much higher than officially reported.,

Abel Kabore, 35, described the attackers, some speaking a foreign language and shouting “Allahu Akbar” - Arabic for “God is great” - raking three buses with bullets after a security vehicle escorting the convoy hit a landmine.

 

The first two buses were able to escape, he said.

 

“The three buses which were shot ... there were so many dead. It was over 100. We were on the ground. We saw everything,” he said quietly at a hospital in the capital Ouagadougou. Of the people on his bus, “only 3 of us survived.”

 

Another survivor, who worked for Australian mining services provider Perenti, said he was in the fifth bus, about a km (half a mile) from the vehicle hit by the explosion.

 

The gunmen fired at the bus for an hour, he said, then came aboard to execute survivors.

 

“These were the last prayers we were praying,” he said, asking not to be identified for security reasons. “I pretended I was dead - that was all I could do.”

 

When he was finally able to leave the bus, he had to climb over the dead bodies of his co-workers. “I saw one body facing up. I knew him. He looked untouched and I called out to him but he didn’t answer. Then I touched him and I knew he was dead.”

 

A security source who works in the sector and a worker at the mine previously said the convoy was likely carrying around 250 people in all, leaving dozens unaccounted for based on the authorities’ casualty list of 38 dead and 60 wounded.

 

Neither Canadian gold miner Semafo nor the Burkinabe authorities have confirmed how many people were in the convoy when it was ambushed on Wednesday on a road leading to the company’s Boungou mine in eastern Burkina Faso.

 

Neither responded to queries on Friday.

 

Perenti has said 19 of its workers were killed in the attack and 20 sent to hospital. The employees worked for its African Mining Services unit, which had been contracted by Semafo for work at its Boungou mine.

 

Panicked workers tried to flee the buses during the attack, then desperately scrambled back onboard away from gunmen in the bush, said another wounded survivor, Bakary Sanou.

 

“People were trying to go back into the buses. I tried to run away into the bush, and saw that they (the attackers) went back onto the buses, opened the doors and tried to kill everyone,” said Sanou, an oversize bandage on his right foot. A mobile phone lay charging next to him on rumpled pink sheets.

IDENTIFYING VICTIMS

 

The bodies of 29 victims were formally identified on Friday, public prosecutor Harouna Yoda said in a statement, adding that their families would be allowed inside the morgue of the Bogodogo District Hospital in Ouagadougou.

 

Distraught and angry relatives had complained earlier that authorities were not letting them view the bodies.

 

“The government should allow at least one family member to go and identify a body,” one man, Ismail Roamba, told Reuters.

 

It was still unclear who carried out Wednesday’s ambush. Yoda said the government had opened an investigation.

 

A homegrown, three-year-old insurgency has spread over parts of Burkina Faso, amplified by a spillover of Islamist militant violence and criminality from its chaotic northern neighbour Mali.

 

In 2016, an Islamist attack on a hotel and restaurant in the capital killed 30 people. A similar assault the next year killed 19. In 2018, militants hit the French Embassy and the army headquarters in Ouagadougou, killing 16.

 

The Boungou mine is located in Burkina Faso’s eastern region about 355 km (220 miles) from Ouagadougou. Semafo has said the mine site is secured, but it has suspended operations there.

 

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Canada condemned the attack and offered condolences to victims. “Canada remains concerned about the deteriorating security situation in Burkina Faso and deplores the violent attacks carried out on civilians,” its foreign ministry said.

 

“We will continue to work with Burkina Faso and partners in the region to prevent conflict and fight terrorism.”

 

 

 

 

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Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:35:15 GMT


Guinea-Bissau newly appointed PM resigns under pressure from Ecowas
BISSAU (Reuters) - Guinea-Bissau’s newly appointed Prime Minister Faustino Fudut Imbali handed in his resignation on Friday after an ultimatum was given by West African regional bloc ECOWAS, the president said.,

President Jose Mario Vaz named Imbali prime minister last week but his sacked predecessor Aristides Gomes refused to step down, triggering a political crisis in an already tensed context ahead of a presidential election. [nL8N27E3DR]

 

Vaz, who is running again in the Nov. 24 poll, dissolved the government saying the political situation was undermining the normal functioning of state institutions in the West African country.

 

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But regional bloc ECOWAS condemned the move, calling it illegal, and held an extraordinary summit on the Guinea-Bissau political situation in Niamey on Friday to pressure Imbali’s government to resign, threatening to apply sanctions if it didn’t comply.

 

ECOWAS also warned that any implication of the army or security forces would be considered a coup and also met with sanctions.

 

Instability in Guinea-Bissau has typically taken the form of military coups, led by officers drawn mostly from a narrow military elite who fought for independence in 1963-1974.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:32:39 GMT


Malta has deal with Libya coastguard over migrant interceptions -report
VALLETTA (Reuters) - Malta’s armed forces have started cooperating with Libya’s coastguard to turn back migrant boats heading into Malta’s search and rescue zone, a newspaper reported on Sunday, citing a secret government deal.,

The government declined to comment directly on the report in the Sunday Times of Malta, but told Reuters the Mediterranean state had been working with the Libyan coastguard for many years and always operated within the law.

Under the terms of the deal, when a migrant boat is spotted sailing towards Malta, the island’s armed forces seek the intervention of the Libyan coastguard to intercept them before they enter Malta’s territorial waters, the paper said.

Non-governmental organisations have denounced previous deals by which Italy has directed the Libyan coastguard to pick up migrant boats in Libyan territorial waters, saying refugees face torture and abuse in the lawless north African country.

The Malta deal appears to go a step further by encouraging the Libyan coastguard to intervene beyond its own coastal waters, which extend some 22.2 km (14 miles) from its shore, and into the broad search-and-rescue zone operated by Malta.

“Search and rescue areas are not areas where the coastal state exercises sovereignty or has jurisdiction, but areas forming part of high seas where foreign military assets have every right to investigate any illegal activity departing from their coast,” the Maltese government said.

Malta has taken in several hundred migrants in recent months, but almost always from charity rescue ships that had picked them up in the central Mediterranean. There have been few reports of migrant boats reaching the island autonomously.

 

 

In a sign of growing cooperation between Valletta and the Tripoli-based Libyan government, Malta seized in September a shipment of unofficial Libyan currency believed to have been destined for rebel military strongman Khalifa Haftar.

Two containers packed full of the recently introduced currency, printed in Russia, were discovered when the ship carrying the money stopped in Malta, local media reported earlier this month.

The Customs Department did not announce the find at the time and has made no subsequent comment on the operation.

 

 

 

 

 

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Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:30:09 GMT


Anger grows as families bury the dead after Burkina Faso attack
OUAGADOUGOU (Reuters) - Relatives of people killed and survivors from an attack this week on a bus convoy of mine workers in Burkina Faso were increasingly angry on Saturday at what they said was a lack of support from authorities and the mining company. ,

Hundreds of relatives, friends and colleagues of the victims waited for hours to recover their bodies from a morgue in the capital Ouagadougou, as a procession of vehicles made its way to cemeteries across the city. “I am unhappy because I lost my colleague and I am unhappy with the way the government is dealing with this,” said Mahamdi Mande, 32, as he waited for the body of his colleague, Moussa Ouattara.

 

Canadian gold mining company Semafo said five of its buses, which were traveling with a military escort, came under fire on Wednesday on the road leading to its Boungou mine in the East region. Authorities said 38 people were killed in the attack, one of the deadliest in years in the West African country.

 

A survivor, who worked for Australian mining services provider Perenti, said neither Semafo nor Perenti had contacted him since the attack, in which he pretended to be dead to avoid being shot at. “They need to treat me like a human being. They could have tried to talk to everyone. I can’t understand it - they should have done better. What they have done for us is not enough,” said the worker, who asked not to be identified for security reasons. Oumarou Tankouano, whose brother was killed, also said he had not been contacted by Semafo. “Maybe after the burials, they are going to contact us. I think if any support is to come, it should be from Semafo,” the 34-year-old said.

 

Semafo and Perenti could not immediately be reached on a Saturday for comment.

 

The government could not be reached for comment on Friday.

 

Survivors interviewed by Reuters have suggested the death toll could be much higher than the 38 officially reported. The convoy was likely carrying around 250 people, a security source who works in the sector and a worker at the mine have said previously, leaving dozens unaccounted for.

 

Neither Semafo nor the authorities have confirmed how many people were in the convoy. The assailants’ identity was unclear, but two witnesses said some attackers shouted an Islamic phrase.

 

All the bodies retrieved by the government had been formally identified by Saturday, public prosecutor Harouna Yoda said in a statement. Distraught and angry relatives had complained earlier that authorities had not let them view the bodies for days following the attack.

 

Semafo has said the Boungou mine site, about 355 km (220 miles) from Ouagadougou, is secured, but it has suspended operations there.

 

Burkina Faso is struggling to combat surging Islamist violence in remote eastern and northern scrubland areas. A homegrown, three-year-old insurgency has spread over parts of the country, amplified by Islamist militant violence and criminality spilling over from its northern neighbour Mali.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:26:12 GMT


Congo army kills leader of splinter Hutu militia group
KINSHASA (Reuters) - Congolese forces have killed the leader of an offshoot of a Hutu militia in the restive east of the country, the army said on Sunday, two months after killing the leader of the main faction.,

    Juvenal Musabimana led a splinter group of the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR), a group founded by Hutu officials who fled Rwanda after orchestrating the 1994 genocide.

 

    His killing is the latest blow to the FDLR, which has been weakened in recent years by arrests of several of its leaders and military pressure from Democratic Republic of Congo’s armed forces, the FARDC, and other militias.

 

    The army “neutralised another radical leader of the FDLR on Saturday the ninth of November at 14:00,” said Guillaume Njike, a Congolese army spokesman.

 

    Musabimana, who was also known by his nom de guerre Jean-Michel Africa, was killed alongside four of his bodyguards following an intense firefight in Binza, North Kivu, near the Ugandan border, Njike added.

 

    Congolese forces killed the leader of the main branch of the FDLR, Sylvestre Mudacumura, on Sept. 18.

 

    The group split in a row over ranks and money in 2007, said Christoph Vogel, a researcher at the conflict research programme hosted by the London School of Economics and Ghent University.

 

    “Compared with Mudacumura, (Musabimana) is a small fish so I doubt this is as significant, but it shows that different actors seem to be converging on a more coordinated push against FDLR and anything they define as such.”

 

    Rwanda’s foreign affairs minister Olivier Nduhungirehe said Musabimana’s fighters were responsible for a deadly cross-border attack in October in a mountainous region famous for its mountain gorillas in which eight people died.

 

    “This is an act of justice,” he told Reuters by telephone.

 

“This is the confirmation of the resolve of (Congolese) President Félix Tshisekedi and the FARDC to eradicate armed groups and terrorist organizations in eastern Congo. We thank them for that.”

 

    The FDLR has also been a source of friction between Rwanda and Uganda in the last year. Rwanda accused Uganda in March of supporting the FDLR and another Congo-based rebel group opposed to the Rwandan government. Uganda denied the allegations.

 

 

 

 

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Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:23:30 GMT


In Kimberley, the world's diamond capital, illicit mining fight flounders
KIMBERLEY, South Africa (Reuters) - The first South African project to bring illegal miners into the formal fold has been plagued by violence in diamond capital Kimberley, dealing a major blow to national efforts to stem a booming illicit trade.,

The project was launched 18 months ago in Kimberley, the site of a 19th-century diamond rush that lured fortune-seekers from the world over. Mine owners granted more than 800 unlicensed, or informal, small-scale miners the right to legally mine around 1,500 acres of diamond-rich waste fields.

 

The aim of the government-backed scheme was to curb illegal mining and black-market trade of diamonds, and serve as a blueprint for future attempts elsewhere in the country, not only in the diamond sector, but also potentially manganese, gold and chrome.

 

However the project has been hit by violence, with informal miners not included in the scheme attacking infrastructure and even members of the newly licensed cooperative, according to mine owner Ekapa Minerals which is running the initiative.

 

The failure thus far of this pilot scheme is a blow to wider corporate and governmental efforts to bring South Africa’s estimated tens of thousands of informal miners, or “zama-zamas”, into the mainstream, to boost productivity and curb crime.

 

Illicit mining and mineral trading cost around $1.5 billion a year in lost sales, taxes and royalties, according to a 2017 estimate by industry group the Minerals Council, and sees criminal networks exploit vulnerable workers struggling to make ends meet.

 

 

While the government has always acted in an advisory capacity, it indicated it may now be forced to take a more active role in the project, the first to attempt so-called formalisation in the mining industry.

 

Asked whether he was pleased with the results of the Ekapa project, minerals minister Gwede Mantashe told Reuters: “I’m not. We will have to assign somebody to work on it.”

 

He did not elaborate on what would have to be done, adding only: “I am not happy because it (informal mining) must be in the mainstream of mining, it must not be in the periphery.”

 

The project’s troubles also demonstrate the perils of piecemeal formalisation in a country whose regulation of small-scale mining lags far behind its African counterparts.

‘THEY COME WITH WEAPONS’

 

Ekapa and Petra Diamonds, then a part-owner of the mine, launched the initiative last year at Kimberley, in Northern Cape Province, hoping to address the problem of an influx of zama-zamas - a Zulu-derived word which loosely translates as “keep trying”.

 

As much as 6 million rands’ ($400,300) worth of diamonds were being taken by illegal miners each month, Ekapa estimates.

 

In a bid to stem that, the company formed 836 miners into the Batho Pele mining cooperative and gave them a licence to mine the fields.

 

But a year and a half later, the track record on the ground is not promising.

 

Illegal miners who are not part of the cooperative have stolen fences, petrol-bombed three Ekapa trucks, blocked access roads with rocks and burning tyres, and sabotaged a waste pipeline, shutting down its plant, according to Ekapa.

 

Ekapa security teams have been attacked with knives, slingshots, rocks, petrol bombs and, in one instance, a hunting rifle, the company said.

 

Ramping up its defences against illegal miners drove Ekapa’s security costs up to around 3 million rand ($200,160) before the project began, and the company is again beefing up security.

 

It has resorted to using alternative, longer routes for its trucks, adding up to a heavy financial burden on the company, said Ekapa Minerals CEO Jahn Hohne, in an interview at their Kimberley headquarters.

 

A police spokesman said its records show 22 criminal incidents linked to illegal mining across Ekapa’s property and the area mined by Batho Pele between March and October this year, including an attempted murder and three serious assaults.

 

Members of the cooperative, who cannot afford formal security, say they are also a target.

 

“The problem that we are encountering now is from the other zama-zamas. They want to enter this thing with force,” said Batho Pele member Victor Taku.

 

 

“They come here with weapons, others come here with firearms, others come here with a spade.”

 

The 44-year-old dressed in orange overalls paid for his son’s university fees with the money he made mining.

 

With joblessness at an 11-year high and the economy in distress, that income is out of reach for many South Africans. [nL8N24V2YB]

DEARTH OF DATA

 

The Ekapa project’s woes show the urgent need for the government to provide clear policy on small-scale or “artisanal” mining using rudimentary techniques, campaigners say.

 

In contrast with other African countries such as Mali, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Tanzania, South African law has no provisions for this.

 

“Our legislative framework is just missing in action when it comes to artisanal and small-scale mining,” said David Perkins, an economist at Mining Dialogues 360, an NGO.

 

Efforts to bring illegal mining into the mainstream are also hindered by a lack of accurate data about how many are involved, what income they generate, and under what conditions they work.

 

“We have so many people that we don’t even know where they come from. That is the challenge we are having,” said Northern Cape police commissioner Lieutenant General Risimati Shivuri.

 

Pontsho Ledwaba, researcher at Wits University in Johannesburg, said there could be as many as 100,000 informal miners across South Africa.

 

To plug this data gap the World Bank is pushing government to conduct a comprehensive study of artisanal mining, and may even fund it, two sources familiar with the matter told Reuters.

 

“Accurate, reliable data is an essential first step to understanding the sector, recognising miners and formalising their work,” said a World Bank spokeswoman. “While the World Bank is in continuing dialogue with the South African government, no study of the sector is planned at this time.”

 

Even should formalisation projects like that at Kimberley ultimately prove successful, another question looms in the longer term: What happens to the small-scale miners when the resources run out, and where do they go?

 

The diamonds in the area of Kimberley mined by the cooperative, for example, are expected to run out in about five years.

“Our dream is that, when we give the land back to Ekapa, 90% of us will have something in our pockets,” said 44-year-old miner Kagiso Nofomela, who hails from the town of Kuruman, about 145 miles away.

“We must have money, cars, homes and our kids must be educated.”

 

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Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:20:00 GMT


Anger grows as families bury the dead after Burkina Faso attack
OUAGADOUGOU - Relatives of people killed and survivors from an attack this week on a bus convoy of mine workers in Burkina Faso were increasingly angry on Saturday at what they said was a lack of support from authorities and the mining company. ,

Hundreds of relatives, friends and colleagues of the victims waited for hours to recover their bodies from a morgue in the capital Ouagadougou, as a procession of vehicles made its way to cemeteries across the city. “I am unhappy because I lost my colleague and I am unhappy with the way the government is dealing with this,” said Mahamdi Mande, 32, as he waited for the body of his colleague, Moussa Ouattara.

Canadian gold mining company Semafo said five of its buses, which were traveling with a military escort, came under fire on Wednesday on the road leading to its Boungou mine in the East region. Authorities said 38 people were killed in the attack, one of the deadliest in years in the West African country.

A survivor, who worked for Australian mining services provider Perenti, said neither Semafo nor Perenti had contacted him since the attack, in which he pretended to be dead to avoid being shot at. “They need to treat me like a human being. They could have tried to talk to everyone. I can’t understand it - they should have done better. What they have done for us is not enough,” said the worker, who asked not to be identified for security reasons. Oumarou Tankouano, whose brother was killed, also said he had not been contacted by Semafo. “Maybe after the burials, they are going to contact us. I think if any support is to come, it should be from Semafo,” the 34-year-old said.

 

Semafo and Perenti could not immediately be reached on a Saturday for comment.

The government could not be reached for comment on Friday.

Survivors interviewed by Reuters have suggested the death toll could be much higher than the 38 officially reported. The convoy was likely carrying around 250 people, a security source who works in the sector and a worker at the mine have said previously, leaving dozens unaccounted for.

Neither Semafo nor the authorities have confirmed how many people were in the convoy. The assailants’ identity was unclear, but two witnesses said some attackers shouted an Islamic phrase.

 

All the bodies retrieved by the government had been formally identified by Saturday, public prosecutor Harouna Yoda said in a statement. Distraught and angry relatives had complained earlier that authorities had not let them view the bodies for days following the attack.

Semafo has said the Boungou mine site, about 355 km (220 miles) from Ouagadougou, is secured, but it has suspended operations there.

Burkina Faso is struggling to combat surging Islamist violence in remote eastern and northern scrubland areas. A homegrown, three-year-old insurgency has spread over parts of the country, amplified by Islamist militant violence and criminality spilling over from its northern neighbour Mali.Reuters

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Sun, 10 Nov 2019 12:27:49 GMT


Zimbabwe fires 211 striking doctors as economy worsens
HARARE - Zimbabwe on Friday fired more than 200 public sector doctors who have been on strike for more than two months demanding better pay to protect them from soaring inflation. ,

The doctors were dismissed after disciplinary hearings held in their absence, as President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s government takes a hard line against a restive labor force.

 

Other public workers say they cannot go to work because they have no money. Police on Wednesday blocked a handful of public sector workers from marching to government offices with a petition demanding better pay.

 

Junior and middle level doctors from state hospitals have been on strike since Sept. 3. They want their pay indexed to the U.S. dollar to stop their earnings being eroded by triple-digit inflation.

 

The doctors defied a court ruling last month that their action was illegal and they should return to work. Patients are being turned away from hospitals because there are no doctors to treat them.

 

The Health Service Board said in a statement it had conducted hearings for 213 doctors and 211 were found guilty of being absent from work without proper cause. Only two doctors attended the hearings.

 

The board plans to call in 516 of the government’s 1,601 doctors for disciplinary hearings.

 

Tawanda Zvakada, spokesman for Zimbabwe Hospital Doctors Association, said he could not immediately comment.

 

The association has previously accused the government of intimidation.

 

The government said last month it had doubled doctors’ salaries. They said that was inadequate, as it would only increase their monthly salary to about 2,000 Zimbabwe dollars ($130).

 

Zimbabweans are bearing the brunt of the worst economic crisis in a decade, with shortages of foreign currency, fuel, power and medicines.

 

The crisis has been worsened by a drought that has left more than half of the population in need of food aid and forced the government to scramble for scarce dollars to import grain.

 

Mnangagwa has asked for patience while his government tries to fix the economy. But hope has dimmed that he can end years of economic troubles that were a hallmark of the rule of the late Robert Mugabe, who was ousted in an army coup two years ago.

Reuters

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Sat, 09 Nov 2019 12:16:03 GMT


DRC president visiting Uganda with delegation of 117 people
President of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Felix Tshisekedi, is expected in neighbouring Uganda for a two-day official visit. ,

But a talking point around his trip is the number of people in his delegation for the visit. A list purportedly presented by the DRC embassy in Kampala to Uganda shows that 117 people are on the president’s delegation.

 

The number comprises of ministers, officials from the presidency, others from neighbouring provinces, business people and embassy personnel.

 

But the number according to the DRC embassy was not exhaustive and was likely to be more.

 

“The Embassy will like to inform that this list is not exhaustive and will be completed as soon as possible with the arrival of the experts from Kinshasa and businessmen from North Kivu Province,” a statement clarified.

Africanews

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Sat, 09 Nov 2019 12:13:18 GMT


Mauritius elects incumbent PM for five-year term
PORT LOUIS - Mauritius’ ruling Militant Socialist Movement (MSM) has won more than half of the seats in parliament, securing incumbent Prime Minister Pravind Kumar Jugnauth a five-year term, the final election results showed on Friday. ,

Thursday’s vote was dominated by calls for fairer distribution of wealth on the prosperous Indian Ocean island of 1.3 million people, which touts itself as a bridge between Africa and Asia and has a flourishing financial sector.

 

MSM won 38 of the 62 seats up for grabs while its rivals, the Labour Party and the Mauritian Militant Movement (MMM), garnered 13 and 9 seats respectively, the election commission said.

 

Two seats on the island of Rodrigues were won by the Organisation of the People of Rodrigues (OPR) party.

 

Jugnauth, 57, became prime minister in 2017 when his father stepped down from the post, and has already introduced a minimum wage to try and improve wealth distribution.

 

“I have obtained a clear mandate to continue to work toward progress and development in this country,” he told his supporters after the count in his constituency.

 

The three parties campaigned on further strengthening the welfare state and improving equality in one of Africa’s most stable and wealthy nations.

 

“I will ask everybody to respect the results without bitterness. Let’s put Mauritius first” said Paul Bérenger, the leader of the MMM, during a speech in his constituency.

 

Some 723,660 voters, 76.84 percent of those eligible, turned out for the ballot, officials said.

 

The turnout was 2% higher than the last election.

 

Mauritius expects its economy, which is dependent on tourism and financial services, to expand by 4.1% next year, up from a forecast 3.8% this year. Analysts expect economic diversification to proceed regardless of who wins the election.

 

The challenger parties, arguing that the Jugnauth family’s rule has been marked by nepotism and corruption, had appealed to voters to choose change.

 

Foreign direct investment in Mauritius totaled 10.68 billion rupees ($295 million) in the first six months of 2019 against 8.84 billion the same period a year earlier, according to official figures.

Reuters

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Sat, 09 Nov 2019 12:10:56 GMT