Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
Camden County New Jersey: home to the poorest and most dangerous city in the US (Camden) and a wealthy community (Haddonfield). MJoTA 2013 v7n1 p0606 click here
Kabilagate in South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo click here

The Congolese 20 were scammed, arrested and have been kept in Pretoria Central Prison because of abuse of power by employees of the South African government click here

Wikileaks, freedom of the press, freedom to know what is private and what is public. MJoTA 2013 v7n1 p0623 click here

Tales from Antigua: Ghanaian prince declares war, Portugal lays the first foreign wreath, a St Bernard dog on a warm full-moon night  click here
Countries spy on each other? Really? MJoTA 2013 v7n1 p0612 click here

Ecuador click here
Ecuador. MJoTA 2013 v7n1 p0623 click here

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News feed on Liberia from UK paper The Guardian

Latest Top (5) News


Weah to face Boakai in runoff for Liberian presidency

Former international footballer will compete against vice-president in race to succeed Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

The former international footballer George Weah and Liberia’s vice-president, Joseph Boakai, will face a runoff for the country’s presidency on 7 November, the electoral commission announced on Sunday.

With tallies in from 95.6% of polling stations, Weah took 39% of the votes and Boakai 29.1%, both well short of the 50% barrier required to win outright from the first round of voting held on Tuesday.

Related: After stability under Sirleaf, Liberians long for more from next leader

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Mon, 16 Oct 2017 07:43:33 GMT


Traffic accident? Call a reporter! How journalists are forcing change in Liberia

A desperate lack of skilled reporters in the most far-flung rural areas became clear during the country’s Ebola outbreak. Now, with the first crop of trainees in the field, the benefits of good health reporting are beginning to be seen

It took just one day for journalist Emmanuel Degleh to restore access for 12,000 Liberians to the only health clinic in their area.

Residents of the mountainous Gibi district had been pleading with government officials to repair a collapsed culvert that was cutting off their only road to emergency health services and the rest of the country. For weeks the requests were ignored. But when Degleh picked his way up the muddy pass on a motorbike to tell the story on community radio and online at Local Voices Liberia, his report caught the public’s attention.

If there’s an armed robbery, they call a journalist. They see us as more reliable than the government

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Thu, 12 Oct 2017 13:00:41 GMT


Monrovia in the spotlight: can this fragile city ever really replace 'Ma Ellen'?

Since the civil war, Liberians have known only one leader: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who helped transform the ruined capital. Now some observers worry that this month’s election could undo Monrovia’s progress

For nearly 30 years, the city of Monrovia has lurched from crisis to crisis. The Liberian civil war culminated in a 2003 siege that destroyed much of the city centre, while riots during the Ebola crisis – in response to an ill-conceived quarantine of West Point, one of its poorest neighbourhoods – garnered international headlines.

Lost amid the bad news is the fact that the city has made a slow but impressive recovery. Today Monrovia is a fairly bustling place. The burnt-out high rises and shell-pocked roads have been substantially repaired. The streets are safer than they have been in a generation, and as the Ebola crisis recedes, the markets and cafes are returning to normal. Thriving music and food scenes suggest it is on the rise.

LIBERIA❤️

Related: Enugu in the spotlight: 50 years on, the flame of Biafra still burns

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Thu, 12 Oct 2017 06:30:33 GMT


'Everything is going to plan' - Liberians vote in first election run without UN

Citizens go to the polls in first election the west African country is managing itself – but echoes of civil war reverberate

Liberians have voted in large numbers in the first election run entirely by the country’s institutions and security forces since the civil war.

Police officers and election officials who had been preparing for months took their places at polling stations, listening sympathetically to complaints about impatient voters pushing in the queue and missing names on the rolls.

Related: After stability under Sirleaf, Liberians long for more from next leader

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Wed, 11 Oct 2017 08:52:31 GMT


Liberia goes to polls to find successor to Africa's first female president

Candidates to replace Ellen Johnson Sirleaf include Prince Johnson, a former rebel leader who ordered killing of ex-president

At midnight on Sunday, as Liberia prepared to vote for the successor to Africa’s first female president, a rebel warlord arrived at his Monrovia residence, where a pair of menacing cement lions greeted him.

Prince Johnson, the former rebel leader who ordered the murder of President Samuel Doe in 1990 – and filmed himself drinking beer as he watched Doe’s ear being chopped off – had just wrapped up his presidential campaign in his countryside strongholds in north-east Nimba.

Related: After stability under Sirleaf, Liberians long for more from next leader

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Tue, 10 Oct 2017 09:15:17 GMT
President of Liberia, Nobel Laureate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf click here
Liberia click here
In Nazi Germany, in Liberia, in Florida, we are all "us". click here
The Vice President of Liberia visits New Jersey and Pennsylvania. SJ Dodgson. MJoTA 2013 v7n1 p0623


A 4-day visit to the Delaware Valley ended today for the Vice President of Liberia, a soft-spoken, slow-moving elderly gentleman with good things to say.

I saw him at 3 events; at the Camden City Hall reception on Friday June 21; at Rowan University Investment Forum on Saturday June 22, and then later on that afternoon at a Lutheran Church in Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania.

Wonderful welcome at City Hall, Camden, NJ on Friday night by the mayor Dana Rudd  and some elected officials and dignitaries.

I was startled when he told us he was grateful to come to this beautiful city. I have never heard anyone say that.  Camden is the murder capital of the US, I only hope events like this will help to turn it around.

At the Saturday afternoon town hall, what really made the audience happy was his saying that dual citizenship has been approved.

Which means that American citizens can still be Liberian citizens, can still vote in Liberian elections, can still run for office. An electorate or more for the Liberian Diaspora? Not yet.

The town hall started late, about 3 hours after the expected time, so I had time to walk around the church with huge stained glass windows and high wooden ceiling and read the 2 placards of protest. Everyone was well-behaved, the vice president gave a calm speech, as did the ambassador, and the commissioner of police in Upper Darby welcomed the delegation, and all Liberians, to Drexel Hill.

Then the protesters started shouting. The large plain clothes detective wearing a lime green tie and a wire into his ear, and he was white, his attempts to blend in failed on so many levels, walked slowly towards the protesters and called inside the 3 Upper Darby police who had been waiting outside.

The Liberian protesters moved outside, shouted for video cameras, and the vice president answered questions. First happily explaining that freedom of speech is a right in the US, and in Liberia.

What impressed me is that we all were able to walk into and out of the church freely.

Anthony Kesselly calmed everyone down, which is what he has been doing since he was a leader in the university in Liberia more than 30 years ago. He was a leader in the Philadelphia Liberian communities for years, and was traveling with the vice president as his policy adviser. Anthony moved back to Liberia last year, it was great to see him.

No-one was patted down before or after, or asked to identify themselves. Very civilized.

Liberia is in good shape.