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Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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biannual

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 23, 2018 is:

biannual • \bye-AN-yuh-wul\  • adjective

1 : occurring twice a year

2 : occurring every two years

Examples:

"The first is status quo: We could leave current daylight saving time in place, and continue to set our clocks an hour forward in spring and an hour back in fall. But some Californians want to end those biannual clock shifts, in part because they correlate with increases in heart attacks, traffic accidents, and workplace accidents." — Joe Mathews, The Californian (Salinas, California), 15 Aug. 2018

"The Television Critics Association's just-ended biannual conference was both a micro look at programming and a macro view of the medium's direction. In a parade stretching over two weeks, about 30 networks, channels and streaming platforms held more than 100 Q&A sessions and countless one-on-one interviews to prove they've got what viewers want." — The Telegram & Gazette (Worcester, Massachusetts), 11 Aug. 2018

Did you know?

When we describe something as biannual, we can mean either that it occurs twice a year or that it occurs once every two years. So how does someone know which particular meaning we have in mind? Well, unless we provide them with a contextual clue, they don't. Some people prefer to use semiannual to refer to something that occurs twice a year, reserving biannual for things that occur once every two years. This practice is hardly universal among English speakers, however, and biannual remains a potentially ambiguous word. Fortunately, English also provides us with biennial, a word that specifically refers to something that occurs every two years or that lasts or continues for two years.





Sun, 23 Sep 2018 01:00:01 -0400


viva voce

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 22, 2018 is:

viva voce • \vye-vuh-VOH-see\  • adverb

: by word of mouth : orally

Examples:

"He was examined according to standard inquisitorial procedures derived from Roman law and medieval practice. Interrogators put questions to the accused who answered viva voce, in writing, or both, as demanded." — Donald Weinstein, Savonarola: The Rise and Fall of a Renaissance Prophet, 2011

"In the old days, voter turnout was significant because the rite was an open event and fun-filled. In colonial Maryland and Virginia, for example, a citizen would cast his vote orally—viva voce—and then would be rewarded with food and strong drink by the candidate he had just voted for." — Thomas V. DiBacco, The Washington Times, 26 Oct. 2016

Did you know?

Viva voce derives from Medieval Latin, where it translates literally as "with the living voice." In English it occurs in contexts, such as voting, in which something is done aloud for all to hear. Votes in Congress, for example, are done viva voce—members announce their votes by calling out "yea" or "nay." While the phrase was first used in English as an adverb in the 16th century, it can also appear as an adjective (as in "a viva voce examination") or a noun (where it refers to an examination conducted orally).





Sat, 22 Sep 2018 01:00:01 -0400


panoply

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 21, 2018 is:

panoply • \PAN-uh-plee\  • noun

1 a : a full suit of armor

b : ceremonial attire

2 : something forming a protective covering

3 a : a magnificent or impressive array

b : a display of all appropriate appurtenances

Examples:

"Like many of the islands of the Caribbean, Jamaica is home to a cuisine that combines a heady mixture of flavors, spices, techniques and influences from the panoply of cultures that have inhabited its shores." — Maria Sonnenberg, Florida Today, 11 July 2018

"'Autumn in Venice: Ernest Hemingway and His Last Muse' focuses on the final turbulent decade of a life, but Andrea di Robilant captures the full panoply of quirks and conflicts that often made Papa and those closest to him miserable." — Michael Mewshaw, The Washington Post, 26 July 2018

Did you know?

Panoply comes from the Greek word panoplia, which referred to the full suit of armor worn by hoplites, heavily armed infantry soldiers of ancient Greece. Panoplia is a blend of the prefix pan-, meaning "all," and hopla, meaning "arms" or "armor." (As you may have guessed already, hopla is also an ancestor of hoplite.) Panoply entered the English language in the 17th century, and since then it has developed other senses which extend both the "armor" and the "full set" aspects of its original use.





Fri, 21 Sep 2018 01:00:01 -0400


milieu

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 20, 2018 is:

milieu • \meel-YOO\  • noun

: the physical or social setting in which something occurs or develops : environment

Examples:

"In researching my second film, Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, I learned just how much independence and bravery it took for Guggenheim to step away from her very traditional roots and move at the age of 20 to Paris, where she … became part of the milieu of the Surrealist artists, and ultimately set out on the path to becoming a world famous patron." — Lisa Vreeland, Town & Country, March 2018

"Critics have called [Nicole] Holofcener 'the female Woody Allen,' noting that the two directors, both Jewish, explore a milieu disproportionately populated by writers, artists, and shrinks." — Ariel Levy, The New Yorker, 6 Aug. 2018

Did you know?

The etymology of milieu comes down to mi and lieu. English speakers learned the word (and borrowed both its spelling and meaning) from French. The modern French term comes from two much older French forms, mi, meaning "middle," and lieu, meaning "place." Like so many terms in the Romance languages, those Old French forms can ultimately be traced to Latin; mi is an offspring of Latin medius (meaning "middle") and lieu is a derivative of locus (meaning "place"). English speakers have used milieu for the environment or setting of something since at least the mid-1800s, but other lieu descendants are much older. We've used both lieu itself (meaning "place" or "stead," as in "in lieu of") and lieutenant since the 13th century.





Thu, 20 Sep 2018 01:00:01 -0400


atone

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 19, 2018 is:

atone • \uh-TOHN\  • verb

1 : to make amends : to provide or serve as reparation or compensation for something bad or unwelcome — usually + for

2 : to make reparation or supply satisfaction for : expiate — used in the passive voice with for

Examples:

James tried to atone for the mistakes of his youth by devoting his life to helping others.

"Tony Stark became Iron Man partially to atone for his history of global weapons profiteering." — Alex Biese and Felecia Wellington Radel, Asbury Park (New Jersey) Press, 1 July 2018

Did you know?

Atone comes to us from the combination in Middle English of at and on, the latter of which is an old variant of one. Together they meant "in harmony." (In current English, we use "at one" with a similar suggestion of harmony in such phrases as "at one with nature.") When it first entered English, atone meant "to reconcile" and suggested the restoration of a peaceful and harmonious state between people or groups. These days the verb specifically implies addressing the damage (or disharmony) caused by one's own behavior.





Wed, 19 Sep 2018 01:00:01 -0400
HIV/AIDS: prevent it, learn about it, treat it:  click here.
MJoTA
United States of America Federal Government FDA (Food and Drug Administration) press releases. FDA works to make safe all medicines which injected, inhaled, rubbed in and swallowed.

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Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on the FDA’s ongoing efforts to prevent foodborne outbreaks of <i>Cyclospora</i>
he safety of the American food supply is one of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s highest priorities. A key part of our work in this space focuses on implementing the principles and measures of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). The actions directed by FSMA are designed to prevent foodborne illness and food safety problems from happening.

Tue, 18 Sep 2018 16:47:00 -0400


FDA takes important steps to encourage appropriate and rational prescribing of opioids through final approval of new safety measures governing the use of immediate-release opioid analgesic medications
FDA takes important steps to encourage appropriate and rational prescribing of opioids through final approval of new safety measures governing the use of immediate-release opioid analgesic medications.

Tue, 18 Sep 2018 13:59:00 -0400


Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on launch of ‘The Real Cost’ Youth E-Cigarette Prevention Campaign amid evidence of sharply rising use among kids
Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on launch of ‘The Real Cost’ Youth E-Cigarette Prevention Campaign amid evidence of sharply rising use among kids.

Tue, 18 Sep 2018 09:34:00 -0400


FDA launches new, comprehensive campaign to warn kids about the dangers of e-cigarette use as part of agency’s Youth Tobacco Prevention Plan, amid evidence of sharply rising use among kids
FDA launched new, comprehensive campaign to warn kids about the dangers of e-cigarette use as part of agency’s Youth Tobacco Prevention Plan, amid evidence of sharply rising use among kids.

Tue, 18 Sep 2018 08:58:00 -0400


FDA approves device for treatment of acute coronary artery perforations
FDA approves device for treatment of acute coronary artery perforations

Fri, 14 Sep 2018 12:08:00 -0400


Statement from Binita Ashar, M.D., of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health on agency’s commitment to studying breast implant safety
FDA Statement on agency’s commitment to studying breast implant safety Short Title: FDA Statement on agency’s commitment to studying breast implant safety

Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:49:00 -0400


FDA provides update on its ongoing investigation into valsartan products; and reports on the finding of an additional impurity identified in one firm’s already recalled products
FDA update on the ongoing investigation into valsartan impurities, recalls and current findings.

Thu, 13 Sep 2018 16:12:00 -0400
Health feeds from Associated Press. Be aware: some of these stories are prepared from press releases from the CDC, NIH, FDA. Some are original stories. Any discussion of a clinical trial or drug is a second-hand interpretation.

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MJoTA is an acronym for Medical Journal of Therapeutics Africa, http://www.mjota.org, click here.


The MJoTA website is updated frequently and has a search engine.


The story of how MJoTA started, and its early days, was published by University of the Sciences in Philadelphia periodical in the summer of 2007, just before my first trip to Nigeria to gather stories and images. To download the story, click here.


The Medical Writing Institute was started in Nov 2008, 6 months after I left University of Sciences in Philadelphia to focus on MJoTA and to unsuccessfully arrange financing for Nairobi Womens Hospital in Kenya. Only 3 or 4 students may enroll each year, 2 or 3 is even better click here.

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Writing about diseases
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WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

Latest Top (8) News


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo remains active. While substantial progress has been made to limit the spread of the disease to new areas and the situation in Mangina (Mabalako Health Zone) is stabilizing, the cities of Beni and Butembo have become the new hotspot. Response teams continue to enhance activities to mitigate potential clusters in these cities and prevent spread to other areas.

Thu, 20 Sep 2018 03:03:00 GMT


Cholera – Zimbabwe
On 6 September 2018, a cholera outbreak in Harare was declared by the Ministry of Health and Child Care (MoHCC) of Zimbabwe and notified to WHO on the same day.

Thu, 20 Sep 2018 01:00:00 GMT


Cholera – Algeria
On 23 August 2018, the Algerian Ministry of Health (MoH) announced an outbreak of cholera in northern parts of the country, in and around the capital province Algiers.

Fri, 14 Sep 2018 01:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Six weeks into the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the overall situation has improved since the height of the epidemic; however, significant risks remain surrounding the continued detections of sporadic cases within Mabalako, Beni and Butembo health zones in North Kivu Province.

Fri, 14 Sep 2018 00:03:00 GMT


Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection – Republic of Korea
On 8 September 2018, the International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) National Focal Point (NFP) of the Republic of Korea notified WHO of a laboratory-confirmed case of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

Wed, 12 Sep 2018 01:07:00 GMT


Yellow fever – Republic of the Congo
Yellow fever outbreak in Republic of the Congo 7 September 2018

Fri, 07 Sep 2018 01:55:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Situation report on the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo DRC 7 September 2018

Fri, 07 Sep 2018 00:03:00 GMT


Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus – China: Update
Since March 2013, when the avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection was first detected in humans, a total of 1567 laboratory-confirmed human cases, including at least 615 deaths, have been reported to WHO (Figure 1) in accordance with the International Health Regulations (IHR 2005). So far, all but three reported cases have occurred in China. In the latest wave (the sixth wave, which began in October 2017), only three human cases have been detected; meanwhile there have been fewer A(H7N9) virus detections in poultry and environment samples, according to reports from mainland and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region China.

Wed, 05 Sep 2018 01:00:00 GMT