Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Serological Tests
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Serological Tests

Tue, 07 Apr 2020 20:21:44 EDT


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup April 7, 2020
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup

Tue, 07 Apr 2020 16:56:56 EDT


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup April 6, 2020
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup

Mon, 06 Apr 2020 17:07:48 EDT


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup April 3, 2020
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup

Fri, 03 Apr 2020 18:18:53 EDT


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Coordinates National Effort to Develop Blood-Related Therapies for COVID-19
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Fri, 03 Apr 2020 13:04:41 EDT


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup April 2, 2020
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup

Thu, 02 Apr 2020 18:56:10 EDT


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Provides Updated Guidance to Address the Urgent Need for Blood During the Pandemic
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Provides Updated Guidance to Address the Urgent Need for Blood During the Pandemic

Thu, 02 Apr 2020 11:55:05 EDT
Feed from Merriam-Webster. If you want to write about health in the Anglo-American language you need to be able to speak and write the language, and spell.

Latest Top (5) News


berserk

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 8, 2020 is:

berserk • \ber-SERK\  • adjective

: frenzied, crazed — usually used in the phrase go berserk

Examples:

The dog inevitably goes berserk whenever he hears the doorbell.

"It was the first costume exhibit I had ever seen in my life. I didn't know such a thing even existed. And I was so excited and I went berserk.... So much of what was in the exhibit, I already owned." — Sandy Schreier, quoted in The Washington Post, 13 Nov. 2019

Did you know?

Berserk comes from Old Norse berserkr, which combines ber- ("bear") and serkr ("shirt"). According to Norse legend, berserkrs were warriors who wore bearskin coverings and worked themselves into such frenzies during combat that they became immune to the effects of steel and fire. Berserk was borrowed into English (first as a noun and later as an adjective) in the 19th century, when interest in Scandinavian myth and history was high. It was considered a slang term at first, but it has since gained broader acceptance.





Wed, 08 Apr 2020 01:00:01 -0400


maverick

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 7, 2020 is:

maverick • \MAV-rik\  • noun

1 : an unbranded range animal; especially : a motherless calf
2 : an independent individual who does not go along with a group or party

Examples:

"'My record company wanted more of "The River & The Thread" but I couldn't do it,' she said. 'It seemed false. So I went in another direction.' It's not surprising for [Rosanne] Cash, who has been a maverick during her lengthy career, to go another way." — Ed Condran, The Gazette (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), 6 Feb. 2020

"Audubon, a naturalist, artist, hunter, showman, and conservationist, was a maverick in his day, and his legacy has come to mean the very heart of bird conservation." — The Pontiac (Illinois) Daily Leader, 8 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

When a client gave Samuel A. Maverick 400 cattle to settle a $1,200 debt, the 19th-century south Texas lawyer had no use for them, so he left the cattle unbranded and allowed them to roam freely (supposedly under the supervision of one of his employees). Neighboring stockmen recognized their opportunity and seized it, branding and herding the stray cattle as their own. Maverick eventually recognized the folly of the situation and sold what was left of his depleted herd, but not before his name became synonymous with such unbranded livestock. By the end of the 19th century, the term maverick was being used to refer to individuals who prefer to blaze their own trails.





Tue, 07 Apr 2020 01:00:01 -0400


incarcerate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 6, 2020 is:

incarcerate • \in-KAHR-suh-rayt\  • verb

1 : to put in prison

2 : to subject to confinement

Examples:

Because the accused man presented a serious threat to society, the judge ordered that he remain incarcerated while he awaited trial.

"But he said that some research demonstrates that when incarcerated people earn a degree, recidivism rates can drop by as much as 40%." — Eliza Fawcett, The Hartford Courant, 24 Feb. 2020

Did you know?

A criminal sentenced to incarceration may wish their debt to society could be canceled; such a wistful felon might be surprised to learn that incarcerate and cancel are related. Incarcerate comes from incarcerare, a Latin verb meaning "to imprison." That Latin root comes from carcer, meaning "prison." Etymologists think that cancel probably got its start when the spelling of carcer was modified to cancer, which means "lattice" in Latin—an early meaning of cancel in English was "to mark (a passage) for deletion with lines crossed like a lattice." Aside from its literal meaning, incarcerate has a figurative application meaning "to subject to confinement," as in "people incarcerated in their obsessions."





Mon, 06 Apr 2020 01:00:01 -0400


forsooth

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 5, 2020 is:

forsooth • \fer-SOOTH\  • adverb

: in truth : indeed — often used to imply contempt or doubt

Examples:

"For sure and forsooth, that means savings for you, dear Renaissance-loving reveler, if you purchase your entry to the weekend-whimsical Irwindale festival by Jan. 6, 2020." —NBCLosAngeles.com, 26 Dec. 2019

"There is a man haunts the forest, that / abuses our young plants with carving 'Rosalind' on / their barks; hangs odes upon hawthorns and elegies / on brambles, all, forsooth, deifying the name of / Rosalind." — William Shakespeare, As You Like It, 1599

Did you know?

Forsooth sounds like a dated word, but it is still part of modern English; it is primarily used in humorous or ironic contexts, or in a manner intended to play off the word's archaic vibe. Forsooth was formed from the combination of the preposition for and the noun sooth. Sooth survives as both a noun (meaning "truth" or "reality") and an adjective (meaning "true," "sweet," or "soft"), though it is rarely used by contemporary speakers and writers. It primarily lives on in the verb soothe (which originally meant "to show, assert, or confirm the truth of") and in the noun soothsayer (that is, "truthsayer"), a name for someone who can predict the future.





Sun, 05 Apr 2020 01:00:01 -0400


solecism

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 4, 2020 is:

solecism • \SAH-luh-siz-um\  • noun

1 : an ungrammatical combination of words in a sentence; also : a minor blunder in speech

2 : something deviating from the proper, normal, or accepted order

3 : a breach of etiquette or decorum

Examples:

"We meet at the stroke of midday on an autumnal day in his West London apartment, where I instantly commit two sins from the Common list: being on time and being Scottish. My host kindly overlooks this double solecism and has made a jug of what he calls rosé cup…." — Jan Moir, The Daily Mail (UK), 14 Sept. 2019

"He even took private instruction in English, and succeeded in eliminating his worst faults, though in moments of excitement he was prone to lapse into 'you-all,' 'knowed,' 'sure,' and similar solecisms. He learned to eat and dress and generally comport himself after the manner of civilized man; but through it all he remained himself…." — Jack London, Burning Daylight, 1910

Did you know?

The city of Soloi had a reputation for bad grammar. Located in Cilicia, an ancient coastal nation in Asia Minor, it was populated by Athenian colonists called soloikos (literally "inhabitant of Soloi"). According to historians, the colonists of Soloi allowed their native Athenian Greek to be corrupted and started using words incorrectly. As a result, soloikos gained a new meaning: "speaking incorrectly." The Greeks used that sense as the basis of soloikismos, meaning "an ungrammatical combination of words." That root, in turn, gave rise to the Latin soloecismus, the direct ancestor of the English word solecism. Nowadays, solecism can refer to social blunders as well as sloppy syntax.





Sat, 04 Apr 2020 01:00:01 -0400
MJoTA is an acronym for Medical Journal of Therapeutics Africa, http://www.mjota.org, click here.


The MJoTA website is updated frequently and has a search engine.


The story of how MJoTA started, and its early days, was published by University of the Sciences in Philadelphia periodical in the summer of 2007, just before my first trip to Nigeria to gather stories and images. To download the story, click here.


The Medical Writing Institute was started in Nov 2008, 6 months after I left University of Sciences in Philadelphia to focus on MJoTA and to unsuccessfully arrange financing for Nairobi Womens Hospital in Kenya. Only 3 or 4 students may enroll each year, 2 or 3 is even better click here.

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WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

Latest Top (8) News


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Since 17 February 2020, no new cases have been reported in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. While this is a positive development, there is still a high risk of re-emergence of EVD given the current challenges related to limited resources amidst other local and global emergencies, continued insecurity and population displacement in previous hotspots, and limited access to some affected communities. It is therefore critical to maintain surveillance and response operations in the period leading up to the declaration of the end of the outbreak, as well as after the declaration – as outlined in the WHO recommended criteria for declaring the end of the EVD outbreak.

Ongoing outbreak response efforts continue, which include investigating and validating new alert cases, supporting appropriate care and rapid diagnosis of suspected cases (which continue to be detected), supporting survivors through a multi-disciplinary programme, and strategically transitioning activities. From 24 to 31 March, an average of 4082 alerts were reported and investigated daily. Of these alerts, 274 were validated as suspected cases, requiring specialized care and laboratory testing to rule-out EVD. From 23 to 29 March, 2376 samples were tested including: 1322 blood samples from alive, suspected cases; 365 swabs from community deaths; and 689 samples from re-tested patients. Overall, laboratory activity decreased by 14% compared to the prior week.

Thu, 02 Apr 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
No new cases have been reported in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 17 February 2020 (Figure 1).

Thu, 26 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
There have been no new cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reported in the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 17 February 2020. However, because there is still a risk of re-emergence of EVD, it is critical to maintain surveillance and response operations until and after the end of outbreak declaration – as outlined in the WHO recommended criteria for declaring the end of the EVD outbreak.

Unfortunately, the response faces increasing limitations that could result in delayed detection and control of flare-ups. These limitations include a funding shortfall, ongoing insecurity and lack of access to some areas, and limited staffing and resources amidst other local and global emergencies.

Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
It has been over 21 days since the last confirmed case of Ebola virus disease (EVD) has been reported (Figure 1). On 9 March, the last 46 contacts finished their follow-up. These are important milestones in the outbreak as over one maximum incubation period has passed without any confirmed cases of EVD. However, there is still a high risk of re-emergence of EVD, and a critical need to maintain response operations – as outlined in the WHO recommended criteria for declaring the end of the EVD outbreak.

Extensive surveillance, pathogen detection, clinical management and other response activities are currently ongoing. These include, but are not limited to, investigating and validating new alert cases, supporting appropriate care and rapid diagnostics of suspected cases which continue to be detected each day, and supporting survivors through a multi-disciplinary programme to help mitigate potential risks of re-emergence. Over the course of the past week (4–10 March 2020), over 32 000 alerts were reported and investigated, and 2584 alerts were validated as suspected cases; requiring specialized care and laboratory testing to rule-out EVD. From 2 to 8 March, 2818 samples were tested including: 1574 blood samples from alive, suspected cases; 376 swabs from community deaths; and 868 samples from re-tested patients. Overall, this was a 16% decrease in testing compared to the previous week.

Thu, 12 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – Qatar
On 18 February 2020, the National IHR Focal Point for Qatar reported one laboratory-confirmed case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection (MERS-CoV) to WHO.

Thu, 12 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Dengue fever – French Territories of the Americas – French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint-Martin, and Saint-Barthélemy
On 12 February 2020, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) reported an increase in the number of cases of dengue infection in French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, and Saint-Martin. In January 2020, health authorities in the region declared a dengue epidemic in Guadeloupe and Saint-Martin and indicated that Martinique is also at-risk of an epidemic.

Dengue epidemics in these territories usually occur when there is a shift in the predominant circulating DENV serotype, and non-immune populations (e.g., tourists, new immigrants, or people not previously exposed to the circulating serotypes) are exposed to the new serotype through human movements within the territories or across neighboring countries. Local transmission occurs through the Aedes mosquito vector present on the islands and in French Guiana.

Tue, 10 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
No new cases of Ebola virus disease have been reported since 17 February, and on 3 March, the only person confirmed to have EVD in the last 21 days (Figure 1) was discharged from an Ebola Treatment Centre after recovering and testing negative twice for the virus. This is an important milestone in the outbreak. However, there is still a high risk of re-emergence of EVD, and a critical need to maintain response operations – as outlined in the WHO recommended criteria for declaring the end of the EVD outbreak.

As of 3 March 2020, a total of 3444 EVD cases were reported from 29 health zones (Table 1, Figure 2), including 3310 confirmed and 134 probable cases, of which 2264 cases died (overall case fatality ratio 66%). Of the total confirmed and probable cases, 56% (n=1927) were female, 28% (n=973) were children aged less than 18 years, and 5% (n=171) were health care workers.

Thu, 05 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Measles - Central African Republic
The Central African Republic (CAR) has experienced an upsurge in measles cases as a result of outbreaks since 2019.

Wed, 04 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT