Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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United States of America Federal Government FDA (Food and Drug Administration) press releases. FDA works to make safe all medicines which injected, inhaled, rubbed in and swallowed.

Latest Top (7) News


Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: January 15, 2021
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

Fri, 15 Jan 2021 17:36:05 EST


Federal judge enters consent decree against Washington state juice processor
The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Washington entered a consent decree between the FDA and Valley Processing, Inc., to stop distributing adulterated juice products until the company complies with the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act)

Fri, 15 Jan 2021 14:18:11 EST


FDA Warns Firms to Remove Unauthorized E-liquid Products from Market in First Letters Issued to Manufacturers that Did Not Submit Premarket Applications by Deadline
FDA issued warning letters to firms manufacturing and operating websites selling flavored e-liquids advising that selling these products lacking premarket authorization is illegal, and therefore cannot be sold or distributed in the U.S.

Fri, 15 Jan 2021 13:58:33 EST


FDA Grants First Conditional Approval Under Expanded Authority to Control Seizures in Dogs with Idiopathic Epilepsy
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted the first conditional approval under its expanded authority to KBroVet-CA1 (potassium bromide chewable tablets) to treat dogs with seizures associated with idiopathic epilepsy.

Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:57:37 EST


CBP, FDA Seize Counterfeit, Unauthorized E-Cigarettes
U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport working in conjunction with agents from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that they have seized over 33,681 units of e-cigarettes with a Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price of $719,453.

Wed, 13 Jan 2021 15:18:38 EST


FDA Releases Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning Action Plan
FDA has released the Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning- Based Software as a Medical Device Action Plan which outlines FDA’s next steps towards advancing practical oversight for these issues.

Tue, 12 Jan 2021 10:35:40 EST


FDA Conditionally Approves First Oral Tablet to Treat Lymphoma in Dogs
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has conditionally approved Laverdia-CA1 (verdinexor), the first oral tablet for treatment of canine lymphoma.

Mon, 11 Jan 2021 13:44:40 EST
Feed from Merriam-Webster. If you want to write about health in the Anglo-American language you need to be able to speak and write the language, and spell.

Latest Top (5) News


modicum

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 17, 2021 is:

modicum • \MAH-dih-kum\  • noun

: a small portion : a limited quantity

Examples:

"While his narrative on the politics of the place is interesting and edifying it's the passages about his adventures by land, air and sea that really capture the wild beauty and remoteness of a region he grew to love. And he exhibits more than a modicum of derring-do. 'I have always flown pretty close to the sun,' [Aaron] Smith says." — Phil Brown, The Courier Mail (Australia), 5 Dec. 2020

"When the Guardian ran my article on the Visual Perception and Attention Lab at Brunel University London and how it planned to investigate why some gamers invert their controls, I expected a modicum of interest among seasoned readers of the Games section." — Keith Stuart, The Guardian (London), 8 Dec. 2020

Did you know?

What does modicum have to do with a toilet? It just so happens that modicum shares the same Latin parent as commode, which is a synonym of toilet. Modicum and commode ultimately derive from the Latin noun modus, which means "measure." (We borrowed the noun commode from the French, who also used the word as an adjective meaning "suitable, convenient.") Modicum, which, logically enough, refers to a small "measure" of something, has been a part of the English language since the 15th century. It descends from the Latin modicus ("moderate"), which is itself a descendant of modus. Modus really measures up as a Latin root—it also gave us mode (originally a kind of musical "measure"), modal, model, modern, modify, and modulate. More distant relatives include mete, moderate, and modest.





Sun, 17 Jan 2021 00:00:01 -0500


effusive

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 16, 2021 is:

effusive • \ih-FYOO-siv\  • adjective

1 : marked by the expression of great or excessive emotion or enthusiasm

2 : characterized or formed by a nonexplosive outpouring of lava

Examples:

Lila's history teacher wrote an effusive letter of recommendation.

"Lyrics like that are desolate, a little tragic; they necessitate a singing style that's not overly effusive." — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times, 8 Dec. 2020

Did you know?

We've used effusive in English to describe excessive outpourings since the 17th century. In the 1800s, geologists adopted the specific sense related to flowing lava—or to hardened rock formed from flowing lava. Effusive can be traced, via the Medieval Latin adjective effūsīvus ("generating profusely, lavish"), to the Latin verb effundere ("to pour out"), which itself comes from fundere ("to pour") plus a modification of the prefix ex- ("out"). Our verb effuse has the same Latin ancestors. A person effuses when speaking effusively. Liquids can effuse as well, as in "water effusing from a pipe."





Sat, 16 Jan 2021 00:00:01 -0500


vulcanize

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 15, 2021 is:

vulcanize • \VUL-kuh-nyze\  • verb

: to treat crude or synthetic rubber or similar plastic material with chemicals to give it useful properties (such as elasticity, strength, and stability)

Examples:

"In 1939 [Charles] Cornell invented a safer and more efficient way of patching holes in tires. Previously people put a piece of rubber on the tire and put heat on it as part of the vulcanization process. Cornell discovered a way to use chemicals to vulcanize the patch to the tire without heat, revolutionizing the industry, [Mike] Murray said." — Maria DeVito, The Newark (Ohio) Advocate, 18 Mar. 2017

"The station was known for the service it provided vulcanizing tires. This type of repair involves external tire damage, such as sidewall cuts, chipped lugs, cracks in the shoulder, and bead damage." — Scott Mall, FreightWaves.com, 20 Nov. 2020

Did you know?

Vulcanize might sound like something Spock from Star Trek might do, but the explanation behind this word has more to do with ancient mythology than it does with science fiction. Vulcanization in its simplest form consists of heating rubber with sulfur in order to improve the rubber's qualities. The Roman god Vulcan (whose Greek counterpart is Hephaestus) was the god of fire and of skills that used fire, such as metalworking. So when Charles Goodyear discovered that high heat would result in stronger rubber, he called the process "vulcanization" after the god of fire. Goodyear developed the idea in 1839 and acquired a patent for it in 1844.





Fri, 15 Jan 2021 00:00:01 -0500


servile

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 14, 2021 is:

servile • \SER-vul\  • adjective

1 : of or befitting a menial position

2 : meanly or cravenly submissive : abject

Examples:

"Ms. [Judith] Jamison remembers Ailey's teaching her 'Cry' in the company's original studios…. 'It took Alvin eight days to choreograph…. Our musicality was always very close. He wonderfully combined movement and emotion, so little explanation was necessary. I was to be a woman who did the most servile of work but was never defeated by it. I was a mother protecting her children. I was a queen who'd come from Africa.'" — Valerie Gladstone, The New York Times, 26 Nov. 2000

"They, while submitting implicitly to his influence, never acknowledged, because they never reflected on, his superiority; they were quite tractable, therefore, without running the smallest danger of being servile…." — Charlotte Brontë, Shirley, 1849

Did you know?

Latin served us servile with the help of servilis, itself from servus, the Latin word for "slave." Servus is also an ancestor of serve, service, and servitude. Synonyms of servile in English include subservient, slavish, and obsequious. Subservient implies the cringing manner of someone who is very conscious of having a subordinate position. Slavish suggests abject or debased servitude. Obsequious implies fawning or sycophantic compliance and exaggerated deference of manner. Servile suggests the fawning behavior of one in forced servitude.





Thu, 14 Jan 2021 00:00:01 -0500


rapport

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 13, 2021 is:

rapport • \ra-POR\  • noun

: a friendly, harmonious relationship; especially : a relationship characterized by agreement, mutual understanding, or empathy that makes communication possible or easy

Examples:

Once our daughter had developed a rapport with her piano teacher, she began to show some real enthusiasm for learning and practicing the piano.

"Johnson attests that the highlights in his career are centered on the rapport established with those he works with and works for." — Douglas Stutz, Dvidshub.net (The Defense Visual Information Distribution Service), 18 Nov. 2020

Did you know?

The word rapport bears a resemblance to a more common English word, report, which is no coincidence: both words come ultimately from the Latin verb portare, meaning "to carry," and both traveled through French words meaning "to bring back" on their way to English. Report has been in use since the 14th century, when it entered Middle English by way of Anglo-French, the French language as it was spoken in medieval England. Rapport was first used in the mid-15th century as a synonym of report in its "an account or statement" meaning, but that meaning had become obsolete by the mid-19th century.





Wed, 13 Jan 2021 00:00:01 -0500
MJoTA is an acronym for Medical Journal of Therapeutics Africa, http://www.mjota.org, click here.


The MJoTA website is updated frequently and has a search engine.


The story of how MJoTA started, and its early days, was published by University of the Sciences in Philadelphia periodical in the summer of 2007, just before my first trip to Nigeria to gather stories and images. To download the story, click here.


The Medical Writing Institute was started in Nov 2008, 6 months after I left University of Sciences in Philadelphia to focus on MJoTA and to unsuccessfully arrange financing for Nairobi Womens Hospital in Kenya. Only 3 or 4 students may enroll each year, 2 or 3 is even better click here.

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Latest Top (5) News
WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

Latest Top (8) News


Cholera – Togo
From 11 November to 28 December, 2020 a total of 67 suspected cholera cases presenting with diarrhea and vomiting, including two deaths a case fatality ratio (CFR: 3%) were reported from the municipalities “Golfe 1” and “Golfe 6” in Lomé, Togo. A total of four health areas (Katanga, Adakpamé, Gbétsogbé in Golfe 1, and Kangnikopé in Golfe 6) in the affected municipalities reported at least one case.

On 17 November, cholera was confirmed by culture in the laboratory of the National Institute of Hygiene (INH) in Lomé, Togo and WHO was informed. On 19 November, the Minister of Health, Public Hygiene and Universal Access to Care of Togo issued a press release declaring a cholera outbreak and on 24 November WHO was officially notified. From 11 November to 28 December 2020, a total of 17 out of 41 stool samples tested positive for Vibrio cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa by culture in the National Institute of Hygiene (INH) in Lomé, Togo.

Mon, 04 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT


Influenza A(H1N2) variant virus – Brazil
On 15 December 2020, the Brazil Ministry of Health reported the second confirmed human infection with influenza A(H1N2) variant virus [A(H1N2)v] in Brazil in 2020.

Mon, 04 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT


SARS-CoV-2 Variants
SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, has had a major impact on human health globally; infecting a large number of people; causing severe disease and associated long-term health sequelae; resulting in death and excess mortality, especially among older and vulnerable populations; interrupting routine healthcare services; disruptions to travel, trade, education and many other societal functions; and more broadly having a negative impact on peoples physical and mental health. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, WHO has received several reports of unusual public health events possibly due to variants of SARS-CoV-2. WHO routinely assesses if variants of SARS-CoV-2 result in changes in transmissibility, clinical presentation and severity, or if they impact on countermeasures, including diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. Previous reports of the D614G mutation and the recent reports of virus variants from the Kingdom of Denmark, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the Republic of South Africa have raised interest and concern in the impact of viral changes.

A variant of SARS-CoV-2 with a D614G substitution in the gene encoding the spike protein emerged in late January or early February 2020. Over a period of several months, the D614G mutation replaced the initial SARS-CoV-2 strain identified in China and by June 2020 became the dominant form of the virus circulating globally. Studies in human respiratory cells and in animal models demonstrated that compared to the initial virus strain, the strain with the D614G substitution has increased infectivity and transmission. The SARS-CoV-2 virus with the D614G substitution does not cause more severe illness or alter the effectiveness of existing laboratory diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines, or public health preventive measures.

Thu, 31 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Yellow fever – Senegal
From October to December 2020, a total of seven confirmed cases of yellow fever (YF) have been reported from four health districts in three regions in Senegal.

Tue, 29 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Yellow fever – Guinea
Between 6 November and 15 December 2020, 52 suspected cases of yellow fever (YF), including 14

Wed, 23 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT


SARS-CoV-2 Variant – United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
On 14 December 2020, authorities of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland reported to WHO that a new SARS-CoV-2 variant was identified through viral genomic sequencing. This variant is referred to as SARS-CoV-2 VUI 202012/01 (Variant Under Investigation, year 2020, month 12, variant 01).

Mon, 21 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT


SARS-CoV-2 mink-associated variant strain – Denmark
Since June 2020, Danish authorities have reported an extensive spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, on mink farms in Denmark.

Thu, 03 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Acute hepatitis E – Burkina Faso
Between 8 September and 24 November, 2020, the North-Central region of Burkina Faso reported a

Fri, 27 Nov 2020 01:37:00 GMT