Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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euphoria

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 24, 2020 is:

euphoria • \yoo-FOR-ee-uh\  • noun

: a feeling of well-being or elation

Examples:

"In February 2014, Xenia gave birth to their daughter, Ella. Ben still recalls the euphoria of watching the nurse place their newborn on Xenia's chest. He still can't quite believe the song that played on the operating room radio, the refrain resounding in that moment: God only knows what I'd be without you." — Caitlin Gibson, The Washington Post Magazine, 9 Dec. 2019

"The floor became a dance-off—in one corner, dozens of girls put all their bags and backpacks in one giant pile, so nobody had to worry where their stuff was, and then danced around the pile in a circle that was really moving to behold, an example of how a Harry Styles concert creates crucial moments of utopian unity and shared euphoria." — Rob Sheffield, Rolling Stone, 14 Dec. 2019

Did you know?

Health and happiness are often linked, sometimes even in etymologies. Nowadays euphoria generally refers to happiness, but it derives from euphoros, a Greek word that means "healthy." Given that root, it's not surprising that in its original English uses euphoria was a medical term. Its entry in an early 18th-century dictionary explains it as "the well-bearing of the Operation of a Medicine; that is, when the Sick Person finds himself eas'd or reliev'd by it." Modern physicians still use the term, but they aren't likely to prescribe something that will cause it. In contemporary medicine and psychology, euphoria can describe abnormal or inappropriate feelings such as those caused by an illicit drug or an illness.





Fri, 24 Jan 2020 00:00:01 -0500


outlandish

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 23, 2020 is:

outlandish • \out-LAN-dish\  • adjective

1 : of or relating to another country : foreign

2 a : strikingly out of the ordinary : bizarre

b : exceeding proper or reasonable limits or standards

3 : remote from civilization

Examples:

"In a letter sent to his mother … [T.S. Eliot] wrote, 'I really think that I have far more influence on English letters than any other American has ever had, unless it be Henry James.' It's an outlandish claim, even if one allows for the kind of hyperbole to be found in a letter meant to impress one's parents." — Kevin Dettmar, The New Yorker, 27 Oct. 2019

"Seana Benz and Jimmy Johansmeyer create a hilarious series of outlandish costumes for the Carnegie sequence, which Woodall showcases in rapid succession." — Gene Terruso, The Philadelphia Inquirer, 15 Dec. 2019

Did you know?

In olden times, English speakers used the phrase "outlandish man" to refer to a foreigner—or, one who came from an outland, which originally meant "a foreign land." From here, outlandish broadened in usage from a word meaning "from another land" to one describing something unfamiliar or strange. Dress was a common early target for the adjective; English novelist Henry Fielding, in Tom Jones (1749), writes of a woman who was "drest in one of your outlandish Garments." Nowadays, the word can be applied to anything that strikes us as out of the ordinary, from bizarre conspiracy theories to exaggerated boasting.





Thu, 23 Jan 2020 00:00:01 -0500


nurture

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 22, 2020 is:

nurture • \NER-cher\  • verb

1 : to supply with nourishment

2 : educate

3 : to further the development of : foster

Examples:

The mayor pushed for tax credits for small businesses as a way to nurture economic growth.

"Nurture your marriage. While it's important to keep the kids happy, it's also important to set aside time for you and your spouse." — K. Lori Hanson, The Miami Herald, 17 Dec. 2019

Did you know?

It's no coincidence that nurture is a synonym of nourish—both are derived from the Latin verb nutrire, meaning "to suckle" or "to nourish." The noun nurture first appeared in English in the 14th century, but the verb didn't arrive until the 15th century. Originally, the verb nurture meant "to feed or nourish." The sense meaning "to further the development of" didn't come into being until the end of the 18th century. Mary Wollstonecraft, mother of Frankenstein author Mary Shelley, is credited with first giving life to that sense in her Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792): "Public spirit must be nurtured by private virtue," she wrote. Other nutrire descendants in English include nutrient, nutritious, nutriment, nutrition, and, of course, nourishment.





Wed, 22 Jan 2020 00:00:01 -0500


bonhomie

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 21, 2020 is:

bonhomie • \bah-nuh-MEE\  • noun

: good-natured easy friendliness

Examples:

"For older athletes, the bonhomie among teammates and rivals who have spent years sprinting or skating together, or boxing one another out under the rim, is often as important as the exercise. Many have become friends off the court, sharing meals and socializing after games." — Robert Weisman, The Boston Globe, 4 Dec. 2019

"Throughout its history, the hugely successful TV show 'Downton Abbey' warmly embraced the tradition of the Christmas episode, a seasonally themed special that continued the endless narrative but with a particularly romantic and sentimental nod to what audiences wanted on Christmas Day, a time of familial togetherness and bonhomie." — Chris Jones, The Chicago Tribune, 19 Nov. 2019 

Did you know?

English speakers borrowed bonhomie from French, where the word was created from bonhomme, which means "good-natured man" and is itself a composite of two other French words: bon, meaning "good," and homme, meaning "man." That French compound traces to two Latin terms, bonus (meaning "good") and homo (meaning either "man" or "human being"). English speakers have warmly embraced bonhomie and its meaning, but we have also anglicized the pronunciation in a way that may make native French speakers cringe. (We hope they will be good-natured about it!)





Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:01 -0500


dauntless

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 20, 2020 is:

dauntless • \DAWNT-lus\  • adjective

: incapable of being intimidated or subdued : fearless, undaunted

Examples:

With dauntless persistence, the ship's crew navigated the vessel through the unexpected storm, escaping with minimal damage and no casualties.

"Dug, as dauntless as ever, travels to the stronghold of his foes. The entrance is shielded by one gate after another, each shunting into position with a mighty clang, and finally, in the movie's best gag, by a little sliding bolt, such as you might find on a garden shed." — Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, 26 Feb. 2018

Did you know?

The history of the world is peopled with dauntless men and women who refused to be "subdued" or "tamed" by fear. The word dauntless can be traced back to Latin domare, meaning "to tame" or "to subdue." When our verb daunt (a domare descendant adopted by way of Anglo-French) was first used in the 14th century, it shared these meanings. The now-obsolete "tame" sense referred to the taming or breaking of wild animals, particularly horses: an undaunted horse was an unbroken horse. Not until the late 16th century did we use undaunted with the meaning "undiscouraged and courageously resolute" to describe people. By then, such lionhearted souls could also be described as "undauntable" as well as "dauntless."





Mon, 20 Jan 2020 00:00:01 -0500
HIV/AIDS: prevent it, learn about it, treat it:  click here.
MJoTA
United States of America Federal Government FDA (Food and Drug Administration) press releases. FDA works to make safe all medicines which injected, inhaled, rubbed in and swallowed.

Latest Top (7) News


FDA approves first treatment option specifically for patients with epithelioid sarcoma, a rare soft tissue cancer
FDA granted accelerated approval to Tazverik (tazemetostat) for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients aged 16 years and older with metastatic or locally advanced epithelioid sarcoma not eligible for complete resection

Thu, 23 Jan 2020 17:59:32 EST


FDA informs health care providers, facilities and patients about potential cybersecurity vulnerabilities for certain GE Healthcare Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers
FDA is issuing a safety communication informing health care providers, facilities and patients about cybersecurity vulnerabilities identified for certain GE Healthcare Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers.

Thu, 23 Jan 2020 14:13:13 EST


FDA approves first treatment for thyroid eye disease
FDA approved Tepezza for the treatment of adults with thyroid eye disease. Today’s approval represents the first drug approved for the treatment of thyroid eye disease.

Tue, 21 Jan 2020 14:40:39 EST


Statement on quality issues with certain Cardinal Health surgical gowns and packs
Statement from Jeff Shuren, M.D., J.D., director of FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health on quality issues with certain Cardinal Health surgical gowns and packs

Thu, 16 Jan 2020 15:11:28 EST


Statement on the Salinas-linked romaine lettuce E. coli O157:H7 outbreak and status update on investigation
Romaine outbreaks declared over, investigation advances, root cause analysis continues

Wed, 15 Jan 2020 15:27:40 EST


Michigan-based food manufacturer agrees to stop production after repeated food safety violations
Home Style Foods, Inc., a Michigan-based food manufacturer, has agreed to discontinue selling food products until the company complies with federal regulations and other requirements.

Mon, 13 Jan 2020 16:28:26 EST


FDA approves first generics of Eliquis
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved two applications for first generics of Eliquis (apixaban) tablets.

Fri, 10 Jan 2020 15:40:00 EST
Health feeds from Associated Press. Be aware: some of these stories are prepared from press releases from the CDC, NIH, FDA. Some are original stories. Any discussion of a clinical trial or drug is a second-hand interpretation.

Latest Top (6) News
MJoTA is an acronym for Medical Journal of Therapeutics Africa, http://www.mjota.org, click here.


The MJoTA website is updated frequently and has a search engine.


The story of how MJoTA started, and its early days, was published by University of the Sciences in Philadelphia periodical in the summer of 2007, just before my first trip to Nigeria to gather stories and images. To download the story, click here.


The Medical Writing Institute was started in Nov 2008, 6 months after I left University of Sciences in Philadelphia to focus on MJoTA and to unsuccessfully arrange financing for Nairobi Womens Hospital in Kenya. Only 3 or 4 students may enroll each year, 2 or 3 is even better click here.

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Latest Top (5) News
WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

Latest Top (8) News


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Nine new confirmed cases were reported from 15 to 21 January in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Thu, 23 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Novel Coronavirus – Republic of Korea (ex-China)
On 20 January 2020, National IHR Focal Point (NFP) for Republic of Korea reported the first case of novel coronavirus in the Republic of Korea. The case is a 35-year-old female, Chinese national, residing in Wuhan, Hubei province in China.

The case-patient had developed fever, chill, and muscle pain on 18 January while in Wuhan. She visited a local hospital in Wuhan and was initially diagnosed with a cold. On 19 January , the case-patient was detected with fever (38.3 °C) upon arrival at the Incheon International Airport. The case-patient was transferred to a national designated isolation hospital for testing and treatment. She was tested positive for pancoronavirus reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, and subsequently was confirmed positive for novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) on 20 January by sequencing at the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). Upon detection, the patient had chills, runny nose, and muscle pain.

Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Novel Coronavirus – Japan (ex-China)
On 15 January 2020, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan (MHLW) reported an imported case of laboratory-confirmed 2019-novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) from Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.

The case-patient is male, between the age of 30-39 years, living in Japan.

Fri, 17 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Fourteen new confirmed cases were reported from 8 to 14 January in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Thu, 16 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Novel Coronavirus – Japan (ex-China)
The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, today informed the World Health Organization (WHO) of a confirmed case of a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in a person who travelled to Wuhan, China. This is the second confirmed case of 2019-nCoV that has been detected outside of China, following confirmation of a case in Thailand on 13 January. Considering global travel patterns, additional cases in other countries are likely.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. 2019-nCoV is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.

Thu, 16 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Novel Coronavirus – Thailand (ex-China)
On 13 January 2020, the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH), Thailand reported the first imported case of lab-confirmed novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) from Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.

The case is a 61-year-old Chinese woman living in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. On 5 January 2020, she developed fever with chills, sore throat and headache. On 8 January 2020, she took a direct flight to Thailand from Wuhan City together with five family members in a tour group of 16 people. The traveler with febrile illness was detected on the same day by thermal surveillance at Suvarnabhumi Airport (BKK), Thailand, and was hospitalized the same day. After temperature check and initial assessment, she was transferred to the hospital for further investigations and treatment.

Tue, 14 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Novel Coronavirus – China
On 11 and 12 January 2020, WHO received further detailed information from the National Health Commission about the outbreak.

WHO is reassured of the quality of the ongoing investigations and the response measures implemented in Wuhan, and the commitment to share information regularly.

Sun, 12 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT


Measles – occupied Palestinian territory
From 1 January through 19 December 2019, a total of 124 laboratory confirmed cases of measles, including two deaths, were reported in the Gaza Strip (case fatality ratio=1.6%). Of the confirmed cases, forty-nine cases (40%) were hospitalized, 12 were among health care workers, and seventy-five (60%) were males. Gaza Strip has an estimated population of 1.99 million (Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics-2019).

In addition, of the confirmed cases, 57 cases (46%) were un-vaccinated, of which 28 (23%) were among infants between 6 months to one year old, and 29 (23%) among age groups higher than 30 years old. Between 2009 and 2018, the median administrative immunization coverage for the second dose of measles-containing-vaccine (MCV2) was 97%.

Fri, 10 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT