Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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scavenger

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 23, 2019 is:

scavenger • \SKAV-un-jer\  • noun

1 chiefly British : a person employed to remove dirt and refuse from streets

2 : one that scavenges: such as

a : a garbage collector

b : a junk collector

c : a chemically active substance acting to make innocuous or remove an undesirable substance

3 : an organism that typically feeds on refuse or carrion

Examples:

My uncle, a habitual scavenger and clever handyman, found a broken exercise machine left on the curb and fixed it so that it works again.

"The 34-year-old scavenger has had to work longer and harder over the past year, underlining how a drastic decline in scrap metal and commodity prices has hurt even the poor who collect discarded metal to sell to scrap yards." — Brendan O'Brien, Reuters, 4 July 2016

Did you know?

You might guess that scavenger is a derivative of scavenge, but the reverse is actually true; scavenger is the older word, first appearing in English in the early 16th century, and the back-formation scavenge came into English in the mid-17th century. Scavenger is an alteration of the earlier scavager, itself from Anglo-French scawageour, meaning "collector of scavage." In medieval times, scavage was a tax levied by towns and cities on goods put up for sale by nonresidents in order to provide resident merchants with a competitive advantage. The officers in charge of collecting this tax were later made responsible for keeping streets clean, and that's how scavenger came to refer to a public sanitation employee in Great Britain before acquiring its current sense referring to a person who salvages discarded items.





Thu, 23 May 2019 01:00:01 -0400


peer-to-peer

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 22, 2019 is:

peer-to-peer • \PEER-tuh-PEER\  • adjective

: relating to, using, or being a network by which computers operated by individuals can share information and resources directly without relying on a dedicated central server

Examples:

"PayPal announced a new mobile peer-to-peer (P2P) payment platform called PayPal.me, which will allow users to create a personalized PayPal link and send it to peers for fast P2P transfers through PayPal." — Jaime Toplin and John Heggestuen, Business Insider, 1 Sep. 2015

"The figures come from a paper presented at Federal Reserve Bank of New York's fintech conference in March, which found 27 percent of peer-to-peer lending dollars had displaced traditional bank lending." — Steven Harras, The Austin (Texas) American-Statesman, 7 Apr. 2019

Did you know?

The term peer-to-peer is a relatively recent addition to the English language, being little more than a half-century old. In its earliest known uses from the 1960s, it referred to something that occurs directly between human peers, people who are similar in age, grade, or status. It can still be found in this use in phrases such as "peer-to-peer tutoring." With the emergence of computer networking, peer-to-peer began to be used in reference to a system of computers that are able to communicate directly with one another without the mediation of a centralized server. Since the turn of the 21st century, peer-to-peer lending—the borrowing and lending of money through online services—has become increasingly common. You might also encounter peer-to-peer in the techy abbreviated form P2P, as in "P2P networking."





Wed, 22 May 2019 01:00:01 -0400


pungle

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 21, 2019 is:

pungle • \PUNG-gul\  • verb

1 : to make a payment or contribution of (money) — usually used with up

2 : pay, contribute — usually used with up

Examples:

Residents have been pungling up to send their little league team to the national championship; donations can be made via credit card or PayPal on the town’s Sports and Recreation website.

"In December 1849, Coffin formed Coffin & Co. and contracted with a New York builder for a … side-wheel steamer to ply the waters between Portland and San Francisco. When he and his partners failed to pungle up the final payment, however, the vessel was sold." — John Terry, The Sunday Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 19 Aug. 2007

Did you know?

Pungle is from the Spanish word póngale, meaning "put it down," which itself is from the verb poner, meaning "to put" or "to place," and, more specifically, "to wager" or "to bet." The earliest uses of pungle are from the mid-1800s and are in reference to anteing up in games of chance. It did not take long for the word to be used in other contexts. We find it, for example, in Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) when Huck's father says: "I'll make [Judge Thatcher] pungle, too, or I'll know the reason why." Nowadays, pungle is mainly used in the western part of the United States.





Tue, 21 May 2019 01:00:01 -0400


remittance

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 20, 2019 is:

remittance • \rih-MIT-unss\  • noun

1 a : a sum of money remitted

b : an instrument by which money is remitted

2 : transmittal of money (as to a distant place)

Examples:

"PayPal has everything it needs to send money to friends or family or to pay bills, even across borders. Its acquisition of Xoom in 2015 gave it a strong position in digital remittance." — Adam Levy, The Motley Fool, 14 Dec. 2018

"Kit … knew that his old home was a very poor place…, and often indited square-folded letters to his mother, enclosing a shilling or eighteenpence or such other small remittance, which Mr Abel's liberality enabled him to make." — Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, 1841

Did you know?

Since the 14th century, the verb remit has afforded a variety of meanings, including "to lay aside (a mood or disposition)," "to release from the guilt or penalty of," "to submit or refer for consideration," and "to postpone or defer." It is derived from Latin mittere (meaning "to let go" or "to send"), which is also the root of the English verbs admit, commit, emit, omit, permit, submit, and transmit. Use of remittance in financial contexts referring to the release of money as payment isn't transacted until the 17th century.





Mon, 20 May 2019 01:00:01 -0400


coin of the realm

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 19, 2019 is:

coin of the realm • \KOYN-uv-thuh-RELM\  • noun phrase

1 : the legal money of a country

2 : something valued or used as if it were money in a particular sphere

Examples:

The coin of the realm changes from one country to the next, so travelers may turn to digital transactions through services like PayPal.

"The 'game' is to see who ultimately will rule from the Iron Throne. This addictive game often plays out like a suspenseful succession of high-stakes chess moves…. There are kings and queens, knights and pawns maneuvering for position, forming strategic alliances on these fictional continents where danger, duplicity, deception and deceit are the coin of the realm."
— Mark Dawidziak, The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 14 Apr. 2019

Did you know?

Coin of the realm gained currency in the English language during the 18th century as a term for the legal money of a country. Coin is ultimately from Latin cuneus, meaning "wedge," and entered English, via Anglo-French, in the 14th century with the meaning "cornerstone" or "quoin." By the latter part of that century, the word was being exchanged as a name for a device or impress stamped on flat pieces of metal used as money and, by extension, for the money itself. Realm entered English in the 13th century with the meaning "kingdom." Its spelling is an alteration of Old French reiame, which is based on the Latin word for "rule" or "government," regimen. In time, realm was generalized as the name for any sphere or domain, and coin of the realm came to signify something having value or influence in a particular sphere.





Sun, 19 May 2019 01:00:01 -0400
HIV/AIDS: prevent it, learn about it, treat it:  click here.
MJoTA
United States of America Federal Government FDA (Food and Drug Administration) press releases. FDA works to make safe all medicines which injected, inhaled, rubbed in and swallowed.

Latest Top (7) News


FDA Statement on the agency’s list of known nitrosamine-free valsartan and ARB class medicines, as part of agency’s ongoing efforts to resolve ongoing safety issue
FDA announces list of nitrosamine-free ARB medications confirmed by the agency to help patients and healthcare providers




FDA Warns Against the Use of Unauthorized Devices for Diabetes Management
FDA Warns Against the Use of Unauthorized Devices for Diabetes Management




FDA approves first anticoagulant (blood thinner) for pediatric patients to treat potentially life-threatening blood clots
The FDA approved Fragmin (dalteparin sodium) injection, for subcutaneous use, to reduce the recurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pediatric patients one month of age and older.




FDA approves first treatment for children with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, a rare autoimmune disorder
FDA approves first treatment for children with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, a rare autoimmune disorder




FDA approves new treatments for heart disease caused by a serious rare disease, transthyretin mediated amyloidosis
FDA approves new treatments for heart disease caused by a serious rare disease, transthyretin mediated amyloidosis




FDA issues warning letter to genomics lab for illegally marketing genetic test that claims to predict patients’ responses to specific medications
FDA issues warning letter to genomics lab for illegally marketing genetic test that claims to predict patients’ responses to specific medications




FDA takes action to protect women’s health, orders manufacturers of surgical mesh intended for transvaginal repair of pelvic organ prolapse to stop selling all devices
FDA informs companies that the agency is not approving their PMA applications and that they will have to remove their products from the market


Health feeds from Associated Press. Be aware: some of these stories are prepared from press releases from the CDC, NIH, FDA. Some are original stories. Any discussion of a clinical trial or drug is a second-hand interpretation.

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MJoTA is an acronym for Medical Journal of Therapeutics Africa, http://www.mjota.org, click here.


The MJoTA website is updated frequently and has a search engine.


The story of how MJoTA started, and its early days, was published by University of the Sciences in Philadelphia periodical in the summer of 2007, just before my first trip to Nigeria to gather stories and images. To download the story, click here.


The Medical Writing Institute was started in Nov 2008, 6 months after I left University of Sciences in Philadelphia to focus on MJoTA and to unsuccessfully arrange financing for Nairobi Womens Hospital in Kenya. Only 3 or 4 students may enroll each year, 2 or 3 is even better click here.

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WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

Latest Top (8) News


Dengue fever – Réunion, France
On 16 March 2018, WHO was notified by the National International Health Regulations (IHR) Focal Point of France, through the European Commission Early Warning and Response System, of an increase in the number of dengue cases reported on La Réunion Island, France, since the beginning of 2018.

Mon, 20 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
From 9 through 30 April 2019, the National International Health Regulations (IHR) Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported nine additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including three deaths.

Fri, 17 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Although the security situation has subsided mildly into an unpredictable calm, the transmission of Ebola virus disease (EVD) continues to intensify in North Kivu and Ituri provinces with more than 100 confirmed cases reported this week.

The main drivers behind the continued rise in cases stems from insecurity hampering access to critical hotspot areas, persistent pockets of poor community acceptance and hesitation to participate in response activities, and delayed detection and late presentation of EVD cases to Ebola Treatment Centres (ETCs)/Transit Centres (TCs).

Thu, 16 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Monkeypox – Singapore
On 9 May 2019, the Ministry of Health (MOH) in Singapore notified WHO of one laboratory-confirmed case of monkeypox. The case-patient is a 38 year old Nigerian man who arrived in Singapore on 28 April 2019 and attended a workshop from 29-30 April. Prior to his travel to Singapore, he had worked in the Delta state in Nigeria, and had attended a wedding on 21 April 2019 in a village in Ebonyi State, Nigeria.

The patient developed fever, muscle aches, chills and skin rash on 30 April. He reported that he had remained in his hotel room most of the time between 1 and 7 May. He was transferred to a public hospital by ambulance on 7 May and referred to the National Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCID) on the same day, where he was isolated for further management. Skin lesion samples were taken on 8 May and tested positive for monkeypox virus by the National Public Health Laboratory on the same day. He is currently in a stable condition.

Thu, 16 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Rift Valley Fever – Mayotte (France)
On 4 January 2019, the National IHR Focal Point for France informed WHO of five human autochthonous cases of Rift Valley Fever (RVF) diagnosed on Mayotte Island through the Early Warning and Response System of the European Union. The dates of symptom onset ranged from 22 November to 31 December 2018.

From November 2018 to 03 May 2019, 129 confirmed human Rift Valley Fever (RVF) cases and 109 animal foci (23 small ruminants and 86 bovine) have been reported in Mayotte. After a steady decline in cases during the last three weeks of March 2019, a slight increase has been observed in April 2019. As of 3 May 2019, one new human case but no new animal foci have been reported. Both human RVF cases and animal foci are mainly located in the center and the north west of the main island Grande-Terre. However, since the end of March 2019, a few new animal foci have also been detected in the east of Grande-Terre and in Petite Terre of Mayotte.

Mon, 13 May 2019 13:30:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak response this past week continues to be hampered by insecurity. On 3 May in Katwa, a Safe and Dignified Burial (SDB) team was violently attacked following the completion of a burial for a deceased EVD case. In Butembo and surrounding health zones, response activities were repeatedly halted due to a number of serious security incidents taking place from 4-6 May. On 8 May, a group of over 50 armed militia infiltrated the city centre. Security forces repelled the attack following intense gunfire in close proximity to staff accommodations. Although activities resumed on 9 May, after almost five consecutive days of suspension, threats of further attacks against EVD response teams and facilities remain prevalent.

These security incidents, and especially the resultant lack of access to EVD affected communities, remain a major impediment to the response, with teams unable to perform robust surveillance nor deliver much needed treatment and immunisations. The ongoing violent attacks sow fear, perpetuate mistrust, and further compound the multitude of challenges already faced by frontline healthcare workers. Without commitment from all groups to cease these attacks, it is unlikely that this EVD outbreak can remain successfully contained in North Kivu and Ituri provinces.

Thu, 09 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Measles – Tunisia
From 1 January through 30 April 2019, the Ministry of Health in Tunisia responded to a large measles outbreak in the country. A total of 3 141 suspected cases, of which 909 (28.9%) were laboratory confirmed and 1 236 (39.4 %) epidemiologically linked cases including 30 deaths (case fatality ratio=1.0 %), have been reported in all of the 24 governorates (range 1 – 1 274). The majority of cases were reported from Kasserine (1 274 cases) and Sfax (212 cases) governorates. In April 2019, four additional governorates were particularly affected with 155, 116, 93 and 69 cases reported from Kairouan, Tunis, Sousse and Nabeul respectively.

The two most affected age groups were those older than 15 years (31%) and infants between the age of 6 and 12 months (28%). The male: female ratio was 1.2. Eighty four percent of affected children between 1 and 5 years were not vaccinated. Death was reported in 30 cases ranging in age from 15 days to 41 years of age (median, 7.5 months).

Thu, 09 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
From 1 March through 8 April 2019, the National International Health Regulations (IHR) Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported 45 additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including 13 deaths.

Thu, 09 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT